Meetings and Events Are a Big Part of Vegas’ Latest Winning Streak

Meetings and Events Are a Big Part of Vegas’ Latest Winning Streak

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Las Vegas has rebounded following a shift away from generating gambling revenue. The Las Vegas strip is pictured here. Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Skift Take: With gambling revenue in steady decline, meetings and events have become extremely important for Las Vegas resorts.

— Andrew Sheivachman

After the recession hit, companies and tourists shunned the country’s largest gambling hub. Now Las Vegas is on a winning streak.

MGM Resorts International’s stock surged to a eight-year high Thursday after the casino giant showed resurgent sales growth in its home market, lifting earnings above Wall Street estimates. The results followed strong reports from Las Vegas Sands Corp. and Wynn Resorts Ltd., suggesting Vegas’s comeback is here to stay — with some help from non-bettors.

Big conventions have returned and tourists are flocking to the Strip’s new nightclubs and restaurants, as hotel operators rebrand and refresh old Vegas landmarks to attract new cash-paying crowds.

While the number of new casinos and hotels under construction remains well below historical norms, the city continues to invest in non-gambling attractions, underscored by the planned move of the Oakland Raiders football team to Las Vegas.

“Entertainment continues to be a key driver for our company and the primary reason people visit our resorts,” MGM Chief Executive Officer James Murren said on a conference call Thursday. He pointed to the year-old T-Mobile Arena, which will soon host the city’s first professional hockey team, and a new theater being built for esports.

Sands Chairman Sheldon Adelson said his Las Vegas casinos reported their highest quarterly profit since 2008. Wynn founder Steve Wynn said his hotel rooms in the city generated the best revenue in the history of his company, with the 75-year-old executive announcing plans to spend $400 million to $500 million building a lake and meeting center behind his Las Vegas casinos.

“This town is a real safe bet,” Wynn told investors.

Executives have also learned to operate their businesses more efficiently. Wynn Resorts has rejiggered its casino floor, putting higher-yielding games in more prominent positions and moving destination games like craps into secondary locations. MGM is benefiting from a multi-year efficiency push that has all its Las Vegas hotels working together to book conventions and meetings.

But with Easter falling later this year, MGM expects fewer conventions, leading to flat second-quarter revenue on the Las Vegas Strip, Murren said. Full-year revenue should still rise in low to mid-single-digit percentages.

Vegas tourism, at 42.9 million visitors in 2016, has been setting records for the past three years. Convention attendance was up 3.4 percent in the first quarter due to large events like the Conexpo in March, which drew 140,000 attendees from the construction industry. Hotel room rates rose 8.3 percent in the first quarter to an average of $140 a night, according to the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority.

Gambling revenue on the Las Vegas Strip, a weak spot in recent years as casinos proliferate across the U.S., rose 5.5 percent in the first quarter to $1.68 billion. That result was largely driven by baccarat, a favorite game of Chinese tourists, resuming its growth, according to Brian Egger, a Bloomberg Intelligence analyst.

©2017 Bloomberg L.P.

This article was written by Christopher Palmeri from Bloomberg and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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April 28, 2017 at 01:04PM

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s Last Home in Aarhus, Denmark

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s Last Home in Aarhus, Denmark

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The house on Fiskergade 82, where Drakenberg lived.

The grey house looks like the others around it, ordinary and unassuming. But a closer look at the walls of Fiskergade 82 in Aarhus, and you will find a plaque with a grand statement: “In this house, the world’s oldest sailor, Denmark’s oldest mariner and Aarhus’ oldest inhabitant, Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg passed away. Born 18th November 1626, died 9th October 1772. He reached an age of 146 years."

The legend of Drakenberg has remained a mystery for decades. Did he actually live until the age of 146? It’s extremely unlikely, but Sophus Emil Johnsen, a Danish sailor and chandler, deeply believed that he did, and was so fascinated by Drakenberg, he spent many years of his life trying to spread the story of this remarkable man.

He certainly had a lot of material to work with: The tales surrounding Drakenberg are numerous and fantastic. Drakenberg’s intermittent career as a sailor in the Danish navy included three stints fighting the Swedes, being captured by pirates, and 15 years as a slave under various masters in the Mediterranean before he escaped and made his way back to Denmark. Once on Danish soil with tales to tell, he became a favorite of the aristocracy who enjoyed his stories and showed him off as a living curiosity. Word of this extraordinary, feisty old man got around and in 1735 he was presented to King Christian VI where he was thanked for his war services under three Danish kings and received an annuity.

In 1760, supposedly at the ripe age of 134, Drakenberg arrived in Aarhus and became a lodger at Fiskergade 82—the house in which he would spend his last years. At the time, most people genuinely believed his tales, and with his huge white beard, he certainly looked the part. Today, these claims are looked at with a more skeptical eye. 

Drakenberg’s body was mummified after his death, and placed for several years on display in a closed—but easily opened—yellow casket in Aarhus Cathedral. It was customary for souvenir-hunting visitors to the cathedral to pluck hairs from his beard. This custom was stopped in 1840 when Queen Caroline Amalie visited the cathedral, saw the body, and demanded it buried under the cathedral floor. This sparked a tradition among local boys, who dared each other to throw rocks through a small opening in the wall yelling "Good Day Drakenberg!"

Inspired by his fellow sailor’s incredible life, Johnsen began to collect Drakenberg paraphernalia, and he claimed to have received permission to make a cast from Drakenberg’s mummified body. Johnsen had made his wealth as a ship chandler, but started spending more and more of his time on his obsession with Drakenberg. He built a house for his business and named it "Drakenberghus." He published the periodical Drakenberg-posten, opened a Drakenberg museum north of Aarhus and introduced the Order of Drakenberg—a trophy in the form of a small brass cannon given to people Johnsen deemed worthy. Past recipients include Winston Churchill and Vera Lynn.

This obsession with Drakenberg would eventually drive him to ruin and madness. Johnsen himself became something of a legend, zealously defending Drak’s legacy in increasingly incoherent letters to the local newspaper, walking his pet goat through town dressed in his sailor’s suit and pretending to be captain of the town’s trams. He died penniless and his last remaining Drakenberg souvenirs were disposed of.

However, one of Johnsen’s contributions that remains is the plaque outside Drakenberg’s last house in Aarhus. It was installed on the November 18, on what would have been, if the stories are to be believed, the colorful sailor’s 300th birthday.

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April 28, 2017 at 01:02PM

Atomic Bomb Loading Pits in Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands

Atomic Bomb Loading Pits in Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands

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Loading Pit

During the final stages of World War II, an American B-29 Bomber dropped the world’s first atomic bombs over Japan. The attack was launched from an airfield on Tinian Island, one of three islands in the Marianas. Today, little remains of the airfield where the Atom Age began, save for two loading pits used to haul the nukes onto the aircraft that carried them over Japan.

Located just over 1,500 miles from Japan, Tinian was an ideal launch site for the U.S. 509th Composite Group and 313th Bombardment Wing. But first, a massive construction project had to be undertaken on the north end of Tinian. Working for more than 45 days and nights, troops built docks, airport runways, barracks, an administration building, oil storage facilities, weapons depots, an air-conditioned bomb assembly building, and two bomb loading pits. The result, North Field, was the largest airport in the world at the time.

The loading pits were necessary to get the massive bombs onto the aircraft, as the weapons were too large to be loaded conventionally. The plane was towed over the pit with its bomb bay doors open, and the bomb was hauled onto a hydraulic mount in the pit then winched into the belly of the plane.

Atomic Bomb Pit No. 1 was used to load "Little Boy," the 4-ton uranium bomb that became the first atomic weapon ever used in combat. The Boeing B-29 Superfortess—named Enola Gay, after pilot Lt. Col. Paul Tibbets’s mother—was loaded late in the afternoon of August 5, 1945, and the following morning took off from Tinian’s Runway Able and dropped the atom bomb over Hiroshima, killing hundreds of thousands in one of the most notorious events in world history.

After being loaded at Pit No. 2, the plutonium bomb codenamed "Fat Boy" was dropped on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. A plaque at the site reads that after the bombing, "the Japanese Emperor, without his cabinet’s consent, decided to end the Pacific war." On August 14, Japan declared unconditional surrender. 

North Field was abandoned after the war, and has been reclaimed by the island’s tropical jungle, though designated a National Historic Landmark. Visitors can make out some faded remnants of the old wartime administrative buildings and airport runways, and the two Atom Bomb Pits have been preserved. They were covered for safety and reopened with commemorative plaques for the 60th anniversary of the Battles of Saipan and Tinian.

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April 28, 2017 at 01:02PM

Atomic Bomb Loading Pits in Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands

Atomic Bomb Loading Pits in Tinian, Northern Mariana Islands

http://ift.tt/2oGdqX2

Loading Pit

During the final stages of World War II, an American B-29 Bomber dropped the world’s first atomic bombs over Japan. The attack was launched from an airfield on Tinian Island, one of three islands in the Marianas. Today, little remains of the airfield where the Atom Age began, save for two loading pits used to haul the nukes onto the aircraft that carried them over Japan.

Located just over 1,500 miles from Japan, Tinian was an ideal launch site for the U.S. 509th Composite Group and 313th Bombardment Wing. But first, a massive construction project had to be undertaken on the north end of Tinian. Working for more than 45 days and nights, troops built docks, airport runways, barracks, an administration building, oil storage facilities, weapons depots, an air-conditioned bomb assembly building, and two bomb loading pits. The result, North Field, was the largest airport in the world at the time.

The loading pits were necessary to get the massive bombs onto the aircraft, as the weapons were too large to be loaded conventionally. The plane was towed over the pit with its bomb bay doors open, and the bomb was hauled onto a hydraulic mount in the pit then winched into the belly of the plane.

Atomic Bomb Pit No. 1 was used to load "Little Boy," the 4-ton uranium bomb that became the first atomic weapon ever used in combat. The Boeing B-29 Superfortess—named Enola Gay, after pilot Lt. Col. Paul Tibbets’s mother—was loaded late in the afternoon of August 5, 1945, and the following morning took off from Tinian’s Runway Able and dropped the atom bomb over Hiroshima, killing hundreds of thousands in one of the most notorious events in world history.

After being loaded at Pit No. 2, the plutonium bomb codenamed "Fat Boy" was dropped on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. A plaque at the site reads that after the bombing, "the Japanese Emperor, without his cabinet’s consent, decided to end the Pacific war." On August 14, Japan declared unconditional surrender. 

North Field was abandoned after the war, and has been reclaimed by the island’s tropical jungle, though designated a National Historic Landmark. Visitors can make out some faded remnants of the old wartime administrative buildings and airport runways, and the two Atom Bomb Pits have been preserved. They were covered for safety and reopened with commemorative plaques for the 60th anniversary of the Battles of Saipan and Tinian.

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April 28, 2017 at 01:01PM

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s Last Home in Aarhus, Denmark

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s Last Home in Aarhus, Denmark

http://ift.tt/2qnzuCo

The house on Fiskergade 82, where Drakenberg lived.

The grey house looks like the others around it, ordinary and unassuming. But a closer look at the walls of Fiskergade 82 in Aarhus, and you will find a plaque with a grand statement: “In this house, the world’s oldest sailor, Denmark’s oldest mariner and Aarhus’ oldest inhabitant, Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg passed away. Born 18th November 1626, died 9th October 1772. He reached an age of 146 years."

The legend of Drakenberg has remained a mystery for decades. Did he actually live until the age of 146? It’s extremely unlikely, but Sophus Emil Johnsen, a Danish sailor and chandler, deeply believed that he did, and was so fascinated by Drakenberg, he spent many years of his life trying to spread the story of this remarkable man.

He certainly had a lot of material to work with: The tales surrounding Drakenberg are numerous and fantastic. Drakenberg’s intermittent career as a sailor in the Danish navy included three stints fighting the Swedes, being captured by pirates, and 15 years as a slave under various masters in the Mediterranean before he escaped and made his way back to Denmark. Once on Danish soil with tales to tell, he became a favorite of the aristocracy who enjoyed his stories and showed him off as a living curiosity. Word of this extraordinary, feisty old man got around and in 1735 he was presented to King Christian VI where he was thanked for his war services under three Danish kings and received an annuity.

In 1760, supposedly at the ripe age of 134, Drakenberg arrived in Aarhus and became a lodger at Fiskergade 82—the house in which he would spend his last years. At the time, most people genuinely believed his tales, and with his huge white beard, he certainly looked the part. Today, these claims are looked at with a more skeptical eye. 

Drakenberg’s body was mummified after his death, and placed for several years on display in a closed—but easily opened—yellow casket in Aarhus Cathedral. It was customary for souvenir-hunting visitors to the cathedral to pluck hairs from his beard. This custom was stopped in 1840 when Queen Caroline Amalie visited the cathedral, saw the body, and demanded it buried under the cathedral floor. This sparked a tradition among local boys, who dared each other to throw rocks through a small opening in the wall yelling "Good Day Drakenberg!"

Inspired by his fellow sailor’s incredible life, Johnsen began to collect Drakenberg paraphernalia, and he claimed to have received permission to make a cast from Drakenberg’s mummified body. Johnsen had made his wealth as a ship chandler, but started spending more and more of his time on his obsession with Drakenberg. He built a house for his business and named it "Drakenberghus." He published the periodical Drakenberg-posten, opened a Drakenberg museum north of Aarhus and introduced the Order of Drakenberg—a trophy in the form of a small brass cannon given to people Johnsen deemed worthy. Past recipients include Winston Churchill and Vera Lynn.

This obsession with Drakenberg would eventually drive him to ruin and madness. Johnsen himself became something of a legend, zealously defending Drak’s legacy in increasingly incoherent letters to the local newspaper, walking his pet goat through town dressed in his sailor’s suit and pretending to be captain of the town’s trams. He died penniless and his last remaining Drakenberg souvenirs were disposed of.

However, one of Johnsen’s contributions that remains is the plaque outside Drakenberg’s last house in Aarhus. It was installed on the November 18, on what would have been, if the stories are to be believed, the colorful sailor’s 300th birthday.

Travel

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April 28, 2017 at 01:01PM

Zalud House in Porterville, California

Zalud House in Porterville, California

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In 1891 the Zalud family, immigrants from Bohemia, built themselves an elaborate European-style mansion with a mansard roof, a style that was unique in the Californian city of Porterville at the time. John Zalud ran a successful saloon with a card room in the back, and his bets in some high-stakes card games paid off. But in 1912 their fortunes began to change.

The family endured an unlikely string of tragedies, and this sad history has been preserved in a small museum at the old house, which has long been rumored to be haunted. 

The misfortune began when one of the Zalud children, Mary Jane, succumbed to a long bout of tuberculosis. Five years later, Anna’s husband William Brooke was shot in a hotel courtyard by a woman who had allegedly rebuffed his advances, causing him to spread defamatory stories about her. At the time of the shooting, he was sitting in a rocking chair, which is today preserved at Zalud House, bullet holes and all. Edward, the son of the house, who ran a bootlegging business during Prohibition, was thrown from his horse in 1922 and died from his injuries. The saddle he was using at the time of his accident also on display at the house.

After this devastating decade, the Zaluds spent most of their time away from the house, visiting occasionally to check on it. The last Zalud to live there was Pearle who moved back to spend the last decade of her life in her childhood home. She died in 1962 and she donated the house and grounds to the city, to be converted into a museum in memory of her parents. 

The rumors of paranormal activity are never too far from a house with so many tragedies, and sure enough, reports of medicinal smells can allegedly be picked up in the house around the anniversary of Mary Jane’s death, rumored to be remnants of her prolonged illness. Haunted or not, the Zalud house is unique as the entire house is furnished with the family’s actual possessions, and walking inside is like taking a step back in time more than 100 years. In a part of California that has long since given way to urban sprawl and innumerable strip malls, the Zalud house offers a glimpse of what life was like in a previous age.

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April 28, 2017 at 12:34PM

Donald Trump Cartoons: Politics and Satire in The New Yorker

Donald Trump Cartoons: Politics and Satire in The New Yorker

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If there’s one thing I trust about Donald Trump, it’s that he’s currently the President. He’s made us laugh until we cried, and then continued to cry in perpetuity. But, as they say, comedy equals tragedy plus time, so one day everything might be hilarious, and also underwater. Our cartoonists have been working hard to transform the daily scandals and horrors into humor, and they’ve been doing a great job. See some of their work above—I’m sure there’s more to come.

See the rest of the story at newyorker.com

Related:
Daily Cartoon: Friday, April 28th
Why Donald Trump Is Skipping the White House Correspondents’ Dinner
1-800-CATS

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April 28, 2017 at 12:48PM

Zalud House in Porterville, California

Zalud House in Porterville, California

http://ift.tt/2pd0CX1

In 1891 the Zalud family, immigrants from Bohemia, built themselves an elaborate European-style mansion with a mansard roof, a style that was unique in the Californian city of Porterville at the time. John Zalud ran a successful saloon with a card room in the back, and his bets in some high-stakes card games paid off. But in 1912 their fortunes began to change.

The family endured an unlikely string of tragedies, and this sad history has been preserved in a small museum at the old house, which has long been rumored to be haunted. 

The misfortune began when one of the Zalud children, Mary Jane, succumbed to a long bout of tuberculosis. Five years later, Anna’s husband William Brooke was shot in a hotel courtyard by a woman who had allegedly rebuffed his advances, causing him to spread defamatory stories about her. At the time of the shooting, he was sitting in a rocking chair, which is today preserved at Zalud House, bullet holes and all. Edward, the son of the house, who ran a bootlegging business during Prohibition, was thrown from his horse in 1922 and died from his injuries. The saddle he was using at the time of his accident also on display at the house.

After this devastating decade, the Zaluds spent most of their time away from the house, visiting occasionally to check on it. The last Zalud to live there was Pearle who moved back to spend the last decade of her life in her childhood home. She died in 1962 and she donated the house and grounds to the city, to be converted into a museum in memory of her parents. 

The rumors of paranormal activity are never too far from a house with so many tragedies, and sure enough, reports of medicinal smells can allegedly be picked up in the house around the anniversary of Mary Jane’s death, rumored to be remnants of her prolonged illness. Haunted or not, the Zalud house is unique as the entire house is furnished with the family’s actual possessions, and walking inside is like taking a step back in time more than 100 years. In a part of California that has long since given way to urban sprawl and innumerable strip malls, the Zalud house offers a glimpse of what life was like in a previous age.

Travel

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April 28, 2017 at 12:33PM

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s House in Aarhus, Denmark

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s House in Aarhus, Denmark

http://ift.tt/2pGM4jN

The house on Fiskergade 82, where Drakenberg lived.

The grey house looks like the others around it, ordinary and unassuming. But a closer look at the walls of Fiskergade 82 in Aarhus, and you will find a plaque with a grand statement: “In this house, the world’s oldest sailor, Denmark’s oldest mariner and Aarhus’ oldest inhabitant, Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg passed away. Born 18th November 1626, died 9th October 1772. He reached an age of 146 years."

The legend of Drakenberg or "Drak," as he was known, has remained a mystery for decades. Did he actually live until the age of 146? Nobody knows for sure. But Sophus Emil Johnsen, a Danish sailor and chandler, deeply believed that he did, and was so fascinated by Drak he spent many years of his life trying to spread the story of this remarkable man.

He certainly had a lot of material to work with: The tales surrounding Drakenberg are numerous and fantastic. Drak’s career as a sailor in the Danish navy included three stints fighting the Swedes, being captured by pirates, and 15 years as a slave under various masters in the Mediterranean before he escaped and made his way back to Denmark. Once on Danish soil with tales to tell, he became a favorite of the aristocracy who enjoyed his stories and showed him off as a living curiosity. Word of this extraordinary, feisty old man got around and in 1735 he was presented to King Christian VI where he was thanked for his war services under three Danish kings and received an annuity.

In 1760, supposedly at the ripe age of 134, Drak arrived in Aarhus and became a lodger at Fiskergade 82—the house in which he would spend his last years. At the time, most people genuinely believed his tales, and with his huge white beard, he certainly looked the part. Today, these claims are looked at with a more skeptical eye. 

Drakenberg’s body was mummified after his death, and placed for several years on display in a closed—but easily opened—yellow casket in Aarhus Cathedral. It was customary for souvenir-hunting visitors to the cathedral to pluck hairs from his beard. This custom was stopped in 1840 when Queen Caroline Amalie visited the cathedral, saw the body, and demanded it buried under the cathedral floor. This sparked a tradition among local boys, who dared each other to throw rocks through a small opening in the wall yelling "Good Day Drakenberg!"

Inspired by his fellow sailor’s incredible life, Johnsen began to collect Drakenberg paraphernalia, and he claimed to have received permission to make a cast from Drak’s mummified body. Johnsen had made his wealth as a ship chandler, but started spending more and more of his time on his obsession with Drakenberg. He built a house for his business and named it "Drakenberghus." He published the periodical Drakenberg-posten, opened a Drakenberg museum north of Aarhus and introduced the Order of Drakenberg—a trophy in the form of a small brass cannon given to people Johnsen deemed worthy. Past recipients include Winston Churchill and Vera Lynn.

This obsession with Drakenberg would eventually drive him to ruin and madness. Johnsen himself became something of a legend, zealously defending Drak’s legacy in increasingly incoherent letters to the local newspaper, walking his pet goat through town dressed in his sailor’s suit and pretending to be captain of the town’s trams. He died penniless and his last remaining Drakenberg souvenirs were disposed of.

However, one of Johnsen’s contributions that remains is the plaque outside Drakenberg’s last house in Aarhus. It was installed on the November 18, on what would have been, if the stories are to be believed, the colorful sailor’s 300th birthday.

Travel

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April 28, 2017 at 12:06PM

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s House in Aarhus, Denmark

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s House in Aarhus, Denmark

http://ift.tt/2pGM4jN

The house on Fiskergade 82, where Drakenberg lived.

The grey house looks like the others around it, ordinary and unassuming. But a closer look at the walls of Fiskergade 82 in Aarhus, and you will find a plaque with a grand statement: “In this house, the world’s oldest sailor, Denmark’s oldest mariner and Aarhus’ oldest inhabitant, Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg passed away. Born 18th November 1626, died 9th October 1772. He reached an age of 146 years."

The legend of Drakenberg or "Drak," as he was known, has remained a mystery for decades. Did he actually live until the age of 146? Nobody knows for sure. But Sophus Emil Johnsen, a Danish sailor and chandler, deeply believed that he did, and was so fascinated by Drak he spent many years of his life trying to spread the story of this remarkable man.

He certainly had a lot of material to work with: The tales surrounding Drakenberg are numerous and fantastic. Drak’s long career as a sailor in the Danish navy included three stints fighting the Swedes, being captured by pirates, and 15 years as a slave under various masters in the Mediterranean before he escaped and made his way back to Denmark. Once on Danish soil with tales to tell, he became a favorite of the aristocracy who enjoyed his stories and showed him off as a living curiosity. Word of this extraordinary, feisty old man got around and in 1735 he was presented to King Christian VI where he was thanked for his war services under three Danish kings and received an annuity.

In 1760, supposedly at the ripe age of 134, Drak arrived in Aarhus and became a lodger at Fiskergade 82—the house in which he would spend his last years. At the time, most people genuinely believed his tales, and with his huge white beard, he certainly looked the part. Today, these claims are looked at with a more skeptical eye. 

Drakenberg’s body was mummified after his death, and placed for several years on display in a closed—but easily opened—yellow casket in Aarhus Cathedral. It was customary for souvenir-hunting visitors to the cathedral to pluck hairs from his beard. This custom was stopped in 1840 when Queen Caroline Amalie visited the cathedral, saw the body, and demanded it buried under the cathedral floor. This sparked a tradition among local boys, who dared each other to throw rocks through a small opening in the wall yelling "Good Day Drakenberg!"

Inspired by his fellow sailor’s incredible life, Johnsen began to collect Drakenberg paraphernalia, and he claimed to have received permission to make a cast from Drak’s mummified body. Johnsen had made his wealth as a ship chandler, but started spending more and more of his time on his obsession with Drakenberg. He built a house for his business and named it "Drakenberghus." He published the periodical Drakenberg-posten, opened a Drakenberg museum north of Aarhus and introduced the Order of Drakenberg—a trophy in the form of a small brass cannon given to people Johnsen deemed worthy. Past recipients include Winston Churchill and Vera Lynn.

This obsession with Drakenberg would eventually drive him to ruin and madness. Johnsen himself became something of a legend, zealously defending Drak’s legacy in increasingly incoherent letters to the local newspaper, walking his pet goat through town dressed in his sailor’s suit and pretending to be captain of the town’s trams. He died penniless and his last remaining Drakenberg souvenirs were disposed of.

However, one of Johnsen’s contributions that remains is the plaque outside Drakenberg’s last house in Aarhus. It was installed on the November 18, on what would have been, if the stories are to be believed, the colorful sailor’s 300th birthday.

Travel

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April 28, 2017 at 12:05PM