John Lennon Left This Sketch Behind When He Moved House in the 1960s

John Lennon Left This Sketch Behind When He Moved House in the 1960s

http://ift.tt/2oPFmUv

article-image

Imagine… moving into John Lennon’s old house as a child in the 1960s and finding his original sketch for the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Lennon once lived in a house called Kenwood, in Surrey, England, with his wife Cynthia. In the four years they lived there, from 1964 to 1968, Lennon worked on some of the Beatle’s most iconic songs in the house’s attic or on a piano downstairs. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band was released while Lennon lived there, too, in 1967.

After Lennon moved out of the house, the new owners found a sketchbook in which Lennon sketched out an album cover for Sgt. Pepper’s. The final version would become one of the most famous albums of all time, but in this early sketch, it’s possible to see the florid idea starting to form. Decades later, the woman who lived in the house as a child has put the sketch up for auction: according to Rolling Stone, it’s estimated to be worth at least $40,000.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

April 27, 2017 at 08:51AM

Frenier Cemetery in Laplace, Louisiana

Frenier Cemetery in Laplace, Louisiana

http://ift.tt/2qc39C5

The Frenier Cemetery.

In 1915, a faith healer living in the small town of Frenier, 25 miles west of New Orleans, predicted that the she would take the town with her when she died. No one believed her until it was too late.

Her name was Julia Brown and she was a traituese in the early years of the 20th century. Locals would come to Julia for a cure for what ailed them, but when her remedies weren’t needed, people stayed away in fear. While Julia’s curatives were powerful, she was rumored to be a voodoo priestess.

Julia was also known to be an oracle. Unless they were coming to her for a remedy, townspeople mostly only saw Julia from her front porch, where she would sit in her rocking chair, play guitar, and sing. Several times she had correctly predicted disasters in surrounding towns. In her most ominous ditty, Julia sang, "One day I’m going to die and take the whole town with me." 

Her premonition came true. When Julia died, and the entire town attended her funeral, perhaps out of guilt or in an attempt to curry favor with the voodoo priestess’ spirit. The ceremony took place on September 29th, the very day that the New Orleans Hurricane of 1915 struck. The Category 4 storm swept through Louisiana, flattening small towns in its path like Frenier. Without a proper weather prediction system, no one saw it coming. All of the townsfolk died except for two, who had left Frenier for the day.

The survivors erected a graveyard for Frenier’s deceased residents. They were all buried in a mass grave, and later given a fence and wooden grave markers. The swampland is believed to be haunted by the voodoo priestess Julia Brown, whose prediction, or perhaps curse, should have been heeded. Her grave is removed from the rest by about 100 yards, which is probably how she would have wanted it.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

April 27, 2017 at 08:23AM

Housing Bureaus Go Prime-Time

Housing Bureaus Go Prime-Time

http://ift.tt/2oPQtNa

We’ve Moved! Update your Reader Now.

This feed has moved to: http://ift.tt/2oVwfCC

Update your reader now with this changed subscription address to get your latest updates from us.

Travel

via Bill Geist’s Zeitgeist http://ift.tt/2oVv1ay

April 27, 2017 at 08:20AM

Frenier Cemetery in Laplace, Louisiana

Frenier Cemetery in Laplace, Louisiana

http://ift.tt/2qc39C5

The Frenier Cemetery.

In 1915, a faith healer living in the small town of Frenier, 25 miles west of New Orleans, predicted that the she would take the town with her when she died. No one believed her until it was too late.

Her name was Julia Brown and she was a traituese in the early years of the 20th century. Locals would come to Julia for a cure for what ailed them, but when her remedies weren’t needed, people stayed away in fear. While Julia’s curatives were powerful, she was rumored to be a voodoo priestess.

Julia was also known to be an oracle. Unless they were coming to her for a remedy, townspeople mostly only saw Julia from her front porch, where she would sit in her rocking chair, play guitar, and sing. Several times she had correctly predicted disasters in surrounding towns. In her most ominous ditty, Julia sang, "One day I’m going to die and take the whole town with me." 

Her premonition came true. When Julia died, and the entire town attended her funeral, perhaps out of guilt or in an attempt to curry favor with the voodoo priestess’ spirit. The ceremony took place on September 29th, the very day that the New Orleans Hurricane of 1915 struck. The Category 4 storm swept through Louisiana, flattening small towns in its path like Frenier. Without a proper weather prediction system, no one saw it coming. All of the townsfolk died except for two, who had left Frenier for the day.

The survivors erected a graveyard for Frenier’s deceased residents. They were all buried in a mass grave, and later given a fence and wooden grave markers. The swampland is believed to be haunted by the voodoo priestess Julia Brown, whose prediction, or perhaps curse, should have been heeded. Her grave is removed from the rest by about 100 yards, which is probably how she would have wanted it.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura http://ift.tt/SEYBhH

April 27, 2017 at 08:16AM

News: AHIC 2017: Industry pioneers recognised with prestigious awards

News: AHIC 2017: Industry pioneers recognised with prestigious awards

http://ift.tt/2qbDAkr

On the final day of the Arabian Hotel Investment Conference, Sheikh Mubarak Al-Abdullah Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah, founder, Action Hotels, and Ghaith Al Ghaith, chief executive, flydubai, were announced winners of the prestigious annual AHIC Awards.

The AHIC 2017 Awards were presented by AHIC Patron, Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed al Maktoum, chairman of Dubai Airports, president of Dubai Civil Aviation Authority and chairman of Emirates Airline.

The event welcomes 700 hotel owners, investors, consultants and operators across an exciting three-day programme.

The AHIC 2017 Awards are nominated and voted for by the AHIC Advisory Board, a panel of 40-plus hotel owners, investors, operators and consultants with extensive knowledge and experience of the Middle East hotel industry.

Chairman of Bench Events, Jonathan Worsley, said: “The AHIC Awards are designed to recognise and celebrate the driving forces behind the Middle East hospitality industry.

“These are the people we hope will inspire the next generation of hoteliers and embolden young, local talent to pursue a career in our dynamic industry.

“This year’s acclaimed winners, Sheikh Mubarak Al-Abdullah Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah and Ghaith Al Ghaith, are pioneers in the regional mid-market travel and tourism industry.

“They are responsible for enabling and encouraging more visitors to come to the Middle East and stay in the wonderful destinations this region offers.

“The underserved mid-market segment is finally getting the attention it deserves, as reflected in the conversation at this year’s AHIC, and as an industry, we are inspired by and grateful to Sheikh Mubarak Al-Abdullah Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah and Ghaith Al Ghaith for paving the way.”

Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed al Maktoum presented Sheikh Mubarak Al-Abdullah Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah with the AHIC 2017 Industry Pioneer Award.


The AHIC 2017 Industry Pioneer Award is presented to Sheikh Mubarak Al-Abdullah Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah

As founder of Action Hotels, Sheikh Mubarak has spearheaded the growth of economy and mid-market hotels in the Middle East and broken new ground internationally, with Dubai-based Action Hotels being the only Kuwaiti company and the only hospitality company in the region to be listed on the London Stock Exchange and regulated by the Dubai International Financial Centre.

On receiving the AHIC 2017 Award, Sheikh Mubarak said: “It is a privilege for me to accept this prestigious Industry Pioneer Award.

“Over ten years ago we identified a material gap in the Middle East’s hotel market.

“There were very few, if any, branded three- and four-star hotels in the prime cities across the Middle East and with the growth of intra-regional travel and the proliferation of budget airlines, I believed there was certainly an opportunity to develop this segment of hotels across our region.

“This led to establishing Action Hotels, which has now become the leading hotel company in the Middle East and Australia spearheading the development of economy and mid-market hotels.”

Sheikh Mubarak continued: “Since the opening of our first hotel in 2008, we now have 12 hotels across the Middle East and Australia, with a further seven in our pipeline in the Middle East and Australia.

“I am very pleased to note that we are no longer the lone player focused exclusively on this sector.

“I am encouraged to witness the meaningful business model of the economy and mid-market hospitality sector also adopted by few others and remain fundamentally optimistic about the power of tourism to change the world.

“By simply expanding tourism, we promote peace and better international relations; this creates stronger relationships and reminds people of our common humanity.”

Ghaith Al Ghaith, Chief Executive Officer of flydubai, was the recipient of the annual AHIC 2017 Leadership Award.

The AHIC Advisory Board chose to acknowledge and thank Ghaith Al Ghaith for showing leadership and entrepreneurship in developing an airline focused on the budget traveller, increasing demand from the budget-conscious visitor and in turn, opening this segment to hotel investors and operators. 

“I am delighted to accept this award on behalf of the whole flydubai team in recognition for their work and for the contribution they have made to the growth of the airline,” said Ghaith Al Ghaith, upon receiving the Award.

Travel

via Breaking Travel News http://ift.tt/QS6xbI

April 27, 2017 at 07:07AM

AirAsia CEO Supports Gulf Carriers in Open Skies Dispute

AirAsia CEO Supports Gulf Carriers in Open Skies Dispute

http://ift.tt/2oPAP4o

Dan Peltier  / Skift

Asia has Open Skies agreements but they are not as liberal as in Europe, said Tony Fernandes, CEO of AirAsia Group. Fernandes (left) is pictured with World Travel & Tourism Council CEO David Scowsill during a press conference in Bangkok on April 27, 2017. Dan Peltier / Skift

Skift Take: The low-cost, long haul model will come to Asia, says AirAsia’s Tony Fernandes, if customers are willing to pay for it. Fernandes isn’t shy about saying he’s jealous about some of the moves Norwegian Air has made.

— Dan Peltier

Gulf carriers such as Emirates should be allowed to benefit from Open Skies agreements and not be stifled by protectionist measures, according to AirAsia Group CEO Tony Fernandes.

Fernandes, speaking with Gary Chapman, president of group services at Emirates Group at the World Travel & Tourism Council Global Summit in Bangkok on April 27, said he’s a big fan of Open Skies, noting that low-cost carrier AirAsia is set to start flying from Kuala Lumpur to Hawaii on June 28. “I’ve defended Emirates and I think they’ve done an amazing job and they should be allowed to do more,” said Fernandes.

“We’re about to start flying to America, to Hawaii, and I think the more liberalization the better,” he said. “Let the market decide who it wants. Tourism is about open access and making it easier. I think it’d be a step backward if protectionism comes in.”

If Emirates can do a better job, governments or other airlines shouldn’t stand in the way, said Fernandes. “[Emirates is] bringing lots of economic development, what’s wrong with that?” he said. “Hopefully Emirates will get what it wants. People will lose jobs with what the U.S. is doing,” referring to the push by Delta, American and United to rewrite Open Skies agreements to combat gulf carriers.

Letting the Market Decide Open Skies

With Open Skies, Chapman said the big three U.S. carriers of American Airlines, United Airlines and Delta Air Lines have done very well with changing their models. “The big three in the U.S. saw us as a threat but to be fair, they’ve changed their models too,” said Chapman.

“Things are changing from a political and economic perspective,” he said. “[Emirates President CEO] Tim Clark recently announced changes to our network. Then there’s concern of long-haul, low-cost carriers. And Qantas just announced they’ll operate a non-stop Perth-London route, as one example.”

In the U.S., the Open Skies debate seems at a standstill as airlines wonder how — or if — the new Trump administration will address it. “Trump has done many U-turns over the past 100 days and he does those because of advice he’s been given from business leaders more than anything,” said Fernandes.

Some 60 percent of AirAsia’s routes didn’t exist before they were launched, for example. “Obviously, we’re jealous of Norwegian Air,” said Fernandes. “We will fly to Europe, it’s only a matter of time. I’d like to fly to New York as well. I’m looking for places where there would be three or four reasons to go. But it’s very important to get the cost structure right.”

Open Skies in Asia

With AirAsia, it took seven years after it was founded in 2001 to get a route between its hub at Kuala Lumpur and Singapore, said Fernandes. “Now we’re one of the largest airlines in Singapore,” he said. “I think increasing connectivity far outweighs protectionist issues. Over the last 16 years, I’ve seen more open travel between two countries and more liberalizations.”

Asia has Open Skies pacts and has come a long way, said Fernandes, but it still pales in comparison to Europe. “Easyjet and Ryanair will have their own issues but I stand by the fact that Asia and Southeast Asian countries have made huge improvements, he said.

The region’s next move related to Open Skies is tackling the issue of airline ownership, said Fernandes. “It’s crazy in this day and age that we can only own 49 percent of airlines,” he said.

Current airline ownership regulations are a waste of capital, said Fernandes. “I think the next stage for the region is that you can have 100 percent of ownership in airlines,” he said.

Further west in Dubai, FlyDubai was originally intended to serve less popular, regional routes, said Chapman. “We thought FlyDubai wouldn’t be direct competitor to Emirates and would work shorter distances and smaller cities,” he said. “But getting some of these routes became problematic because of politics. FlyDubai then tended to overlay some of its network on top of Emirates.”

FlyDubai, which like Emirates is also owned by the UAE government, became a major competitor. “The Chinese walls that exist between [Emirates and FlyDubai] are quite solvent and quite strong,” said Chapman. “It takes changing times and difficult times to focus attention.”

AirAsia’s Low-Cost, Long-Haul Ambitions and Challenges

Chapman said that, in time, FlyDubai’s originally intended model will be better integrated with Emirates’ long-haul markets.

Fernandes said that as an entrepreneur founding AirAsia he learned a lot from Emirates and its global ambitions. “I remember the first time I arrived in Dubai and saw a map on the terminal wall that showed where Emirates flies and I said, ‘Jeez, these guys go anywhere,’” he said. “[AirAsia] can’t do what Emirates does because they’re geographically in the center of the world, but we’re perfect for Asia.”

But expanding AirAsia’s long-haul routes goes beyond politics — the airline hadn’t been as aggressive in purchasing necessary aircraft to fly such routes. “I’ve always said the airline industry is kind of unique in that it’s tried to do everything itself and now many airlines have a premium economy as well,” said Fernandes.

“I’ve always said in time I think you’ll have two different models. You’ll have predominantly low-cost carriers doing an economy product and long-haul carriers like Emirates, for example, doing business and first class products,” said Fernades. “It’s evolving into that process. In some ways we’re a traditional network carrier already.”

AirAsia isn’t debating whether passenger demand in Asia and Southeast Asia will call for more long-haul routes. “The question is whether they’re prepared to pay for it,” said Fernandes. “Point-to-point low-cost model will definitely happen in the long-haul market. AirAsia has been very successful in going to metro cities but also secondary cities. That’s going to start happening in the long-haul market.”

But Fernandes might already have his answer with the price point on long-haul routes. Southeast Asian travelers are projected to be a $76 billion online travel market by 2025 and last year Chinese travelers spent $261 billion on foreign travel (12 percent more than 2015), a global record for tourism spending.

 

Travel

via Skift https://skift.com

April 27, 2017 at 07:00AM

News: AHIC 2017: Mid-market hotels offer opportunity in Middle East

News: AHIC 2017: Mid-market hotels offer opportunity in Middle East

http://ift.tt/2qiNH3r

The economy and mid-market hotel segment was identified as presenting a significant opportunity for hotel owners and operators alike at the Arabian Hotel Investment Conference.

Expert speakers also identified a gap in the market for more experiential accommodation and entertainment attractions, especially in Dubai, as the market continues to diversify its hospitality offering.

In an exclusive presentation, STR managing director Robin Rossmann provided insight into the midscale pipeline and performance in the GCC, revealing that mid-market supply is set to match luxury in the GCC by 2021.

According to STR, the ‘Midscale’ has out-performed the ‘Upscale & Upper Mid Classes’ and ‘Luxury & Upper Upscale’ classes since 2011 across the GCC.
Rossmann observed that mid-market hotels are under-penetrated and pointed to significant growth potential underpinned by growing intra-regional travel and demand for affordable travel.

Commenting on the trends, Jonathan Worsley, chairman at AHIC-organiser Bench Events, said: “The mid-market has been discussed at AHIC for several years, but in 2017, we have witnessed a significant shift as the compelling investment model for lower development costs and higher, quicker returns has put the mid-market in favour.

“It was fascinating to explore the long-term view, looking at costs, rate strategy and returns with our many speakers and sponsors.

“Testament to the potential for the mid-market in the Middle East is the launch of US-based hotelier Choice Hotels International in the UAE and Saudi Arabia, with a pipeline of seven signed hotels already and many more to come.

Commenting on the company’s expansion, Stephen Joyce, chief executive of Choice Hotels said the growth of the middle class and demand from travellers for quality, midscale accommodation had fuelled Choice Hotels International’s entry to the Middle East with three of its brands: Clarion, Comfort and Quality.

“We think the timing’s now finally right for a company like Choice to enter the market in a fairly significant way and establish a strong moderate tier lodging component which is purpose-built, value-oriented, but high quality,” said Joyce, during his live-on-stage interview with Jonathan Worsley.

Joyce added: “Historically when you look at this region and what people considered moderate, they kind of pull the chandelier and pull the marble and they don’t change the operating model.

“Our operating model is there should be 20-25 employees in the hotel; it should run very high margins; it should be relatively low capex to get in; relatively high margin production and low cost to operate, but at the same time, satisfy the guests’ needs in a way that isn’t being done currently.”

Travel

via Breaking Travel News http://ift.tt/QS6xbI

April 27, 2017 at 06:47AM

The one thing killing your revenue strategy

The one thing killing your revenue strategy

http://ift.tt/2ozK1Ob

There’s no denying that ideal pricing is important to an intelligent revenue strategy. A hotel’s pricing strategy significantly contributes to profitable revenue management approaches, with surges in technology, social media and online booking platforms providing sheathes of data to incorporate into pricing decisions.

NB This is a viewpoint by Blake Madril, revenue technology strategist at IDeaS Revenue Solutions.

Relevant market data such as reputation information, competitive market pricing and travel intent data are common examples of industry intelligence used in advanced revenue technology to optimize pricing.

However, it’s key to recognize there’s more to revenue management than just pricing considerations – and hotels that only use their revenue technology to adjust rate could be losing out to today’s number one revenue killer: a lack of automated inventory controls.

Think about a city center hotel forecast to sell out on a Tuesday and Wednesday. Continuously increasing price – when the hotel faces not only stiff market competition but also fair price perceptions – runs the risk of leaving  high demand rooms unsold. Looking past charging skyrocketing prices, how can hotels profitably yield during high demand time periods through flexible inventory controls?

Hotels historically managed their inventory through the use of manual controls in property management and reservations systems, and most automated revenue management systems still give a similarly archaic method of utilizing these controls.

But hotels that can’t go beyond manual inventory management can’t maximize their revenue management strategy.

Demand and pick-up shift constantly, and a strategy at the beginning of a work day may not be the same strategy at the end of the day. In a manual environment, hotels do not have the time to constantly validate technology that should be adapting to the demand in the market on its own.

Technology that still utilizes manual controls only allows hotels to account for high demand days with either a Closed to Arrival (which restricts business on those days) or a minimum length-of-stay control for either night.

While the former helps restrict one- or two-night bookings over high demand days, what happens to the guest checking in on Tuesday and staying for six nights? How would the hotel keep from turning them away, while also offering availability that isn’t open to a guest staying for only two nights?

Using the latter option means the hotel could put a three-night minimum length of stay on Tuesday and a two-night minimum on Wednesday. However, then someone could check in on Wednesday for two nights, but a guest checking in on Monday for two nights would be turned away.

These rules-based controls not only hold hotels back from achieving their most profitable results but also require a lot of time, management and manual deployment from the revenue team. Simply said, inventory controls that set inflexible blanket rules for an entire day cannot maximize hotel profitability.

Automated inventory controls are flexible and evaluate the value of each unique reservation inquiry – accounting for an increased expectation of demand fluctuation and price agility.

Hotels relying on setting manual inventory rules not only fall victim to this number one revenue strategy killer, but they also lose out on the profits and market share their competition is gaining.

 

SC MARCH16 NEW IdeaS 400w

 

NB1: This is a viewpoint by Blake Madril, revenue technology strategist at IDeaS Revenue Solutions. It appears here as part of Tnooz’s sponsored content initiative.

NB2:  Image by BigStock

Travel

via Tnooz https://www.tnooz.com

April 27, 2017 at 06:05AM

Facebook Expands Its Dynamic Ads for Travel to Airlines

Facebook Expands Its Dynamic Ads for Travel to Airlines

http://ift.tt/2qidysb

Facebook

Facebook is hoping to attract more airline advertisers with its newest product, Dynamic Ads for Travel for flights, which is geared toward mobile users. Pictured here are images from Cathay Pacific’s Dynamic Ads for Travel. Facebook

Skift Take: The bigger question here is this: Should airlines and their travel peers be investing more in social versus search?

— Deanna Ting

Just as it did last May, Facebook is rolling out new Dynamic Ads for Travel on its platform as well as on its Instagram brand, only this time, instead of being geared toward hotels and destinations, it’s tailored toward airlines.

“It’s fundamentally the same,” said Christine Warner, Facebook’s head of travel. “The only thing that’s different is that we’re able to allow our partners to optimize against route and schedule, which is unique to flights versus hotel remarketing.” For either Facebook or Instagram. the process is the same for advertisers.

If Facebook and Instagram’s early success with Dynamic Ads for Travel for hotels and destinations is any indication, it seems that these advertisements for flights have the potential likewise to be impactful.

Melia Hotels, for example, saw a 6.7 times return on investment versus its legacy retargeting campaign when using Facebook’s dynamic ads for hotels, for example.

Warner also noted that one of its pilot airline partners, Cathay Pacific, has seen reductions in cost per acquisition of 15 percent using Dynamic Ads for Travel, and has increased its booking volumes by 16 percent.

But what of the complex nature of fluctuating airlines prices and flight availability? Warner said the new dynamic ads for flights have taken that into consideration.

“For pricing, we do it in two ways,” she said. “The first is we can either capture through the pixels the price that was last searched by the individual to then remarket to them against that route reschedule with that price. The other way that we allow our partners to do this is by them sharing a price drop and they can update that every 15 minutes and generally, it is a price from $99 for the next two days. They would be able to have that be part of the ad copy in the ad itself.”

Social Versus Search

Given this early feedback, however, is there good enough reason yet for airlines and other travel brands to be looking more at Facebook and Instagram for their ad spend? That’s the bigger question at the heart of this new advertising push from Facebook, especially as it tries to take away market share from Google.

Although Google reaps the benefits of massive ad spend from the likes of the big online travel agencies like Priceline and Expedia, and have the upper hand — for now — products like Dynamic Ads for Travel are making Facebook and Instagram more desirable among travel brands who want to reach the social networks’ more than 1.8 billion monthly users.

“What makes Facebook a lot different from using Google Flights, for instance, is that Google Flights is more of a metasearch product,” said Nicholas Ward, president and co-founder of Koddi, a company that assists advertisers with managing hotel price ads and other metasearch advertising. “You can take your structured data and put the best offer in front of the consumer, and the consumer can decide from there, using all the available tools that Google has available.”

Facebook, on the other hand, Ward notes, is much more targeted in its approach to reaching consumers.

“For example, if American Airlines were to push their data to Google today, there are capabilities to sort out experience. If American makes that connection with Facebook they have the ability to say, ‘With this segment of users we want to have this experience, etc., based on the customers who have been to our site and we want to treat them differently.’ You can slice and dice the audience in a much more granular way and even offer different deals. The targeting of the user is that much more refined.”

Another reason why Facebook hopes more travel brands will consider upping their ad spend with the social platform versus other providers has to do with increasing usage of mobile, something Warner has spoken of at length previously with Skift.

Warner said that data from summer 2016 showed that 93 percent of conversations on Facebook and Instagram were taking place on mobile, with travel being one of the top topics discussed. Facebook IQ research has also demonstrated how 85 percent of travel is planned on a mobile device, and when people start planning their trips, 50 percent reach for their phones first.

“Consumer behavior and travelers’ behaviors have shifted to mobile,” Warner said. “They’re going to 56 travel-related touch points, but during that same timeframe, they’re also spending five times more time with Facebook and Instagram than they are with any one travel-related site. We, at Facebook and Instagram, are with people one out of every five minutes, every single day, on their mobile device.”

As for what travel brands should be doing to leverage the full capabilities of mobile advertising on social, Warner said, “It’s imperative to not only retarget people but to actually go and meet travelers where they are, to inspire them to take their next trip through mobile-first video. Don’t forget about the creative.”

Travel

via Skift https://skift.com

April 27, 2017 at 05:35AM

Facebook extends Dynamic Ads to let airlines in as well

Facebook extends Dynamic Ads to let airlines in as well

http://ift.tt/2qaUsbe

Facebook will now allow airlines to target users of the site with content based on when and where people perhaps want to travel.

The functionality is available on both Facebook and its sister photo-sharing service Instagram.

The ads can be based on location, time and other factors, tapping into the user behaviour and where they may have previously expressed a preference for a destination or look for ideas for a trip during a particular month ahead.

Brands taking part during a test phase include Cathay Pacific and Delta.

Facebook claims Cathay, for example, has experienced a 16x increase in booking volume as a result of using the targeted ads, with a reduction in cost-per-acquisition from the airline’s use of the social network’s ad platform to the tune of 15%.

The addition of airlines to the Dynamic Ads for Travel (DAT) programme comes almsot a year to the day since the product was first launched for hotels and intermediaries.

Cathay assistant marketing manager, Lisa Leung, claims DATs are giving it better “ad efficiency and cost reductions” compared to its other partners – presumably search engines such as Google.

Delta CMO Tim Mapes says the DAT format can allow it to target potential passengers using Facebook’s social graph and its own data.

“The new ad supports Delta’s strategy to deliver greater personalization, allowing us to automatically target the right customer with highly relevant messaging based on each person’s itinerary and interests.”

Travel

via Tnooz https://www.tnooz.com

April 27, 2017 at 05:33AM