The 1957 Rikers Island Plane Crash That Made Inmates Heroes

The 1957 Rikers Island Plane Crash That Made Inmates Heroes

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Peggy Benson wanted to get off the plane. The flight from New York’s Laguardia airport to Miami had already been delayed by hours. Scheduled to take off at 2:45, it was now 6pm. The city was blanketed in a snowstorm and passengers waited while crew de-iced the plane’s wings. Now she sat on board as snow fell outside and she was upset.

“She wanted to get off,” her husband Mason would tell The New York Times the next day, “The stewardess talked her out of it.” They were told that if they left, their bags would continue on to Florida without them. They stayed despite Peggy’s qualms, and the plane taxied down the runway and then took off, climbing into the wintry night.

It was February 1, 1957 and Northeast Airlines Flight 823 would remain airborne for about one minute before plunging from the sky and crashing onto Rikers Island, New York’s 400 acre prison complex.

“All of a sudden,” Peggy said, “Everything was afire. My husband pushed me toward a window.” She hit the ground and started running.

Prisoner Angel Gorbea was playing cards when the plane went down.

“Then,” Gorbea told the Times, “the explosions came. “Then the whole sky, even through the snow, was lighted. We stood at the windows. We saw the people tumbling out of that ship—they were all lighted, too, by the flames. We saw them and their shadows. We saw them stumble.”

Delphine Proelss Lowe was an 11-year-old inhabitant of Rikers at the time of the crash; her father was the island’s Episcopal chaplain.

”My mother and a houseman were preparing dinner when we heard a loud roar, saw a very bright flash and heard my mother scream,” she recalled 50 years after the disaster.

The plane’s left wing had been sheared off, the engine torn away and flames poured forth from the wreckage. It was a scene of chaos. People were on fire and struggled to escape, rolling in the snow as the storm continued around them.

“I was caught on my seat,” said Jacob Taub, a doctor from the Bronx. “Flames licking the back of my neck.”

Twenty people died in the crash, while 81 survivors either fought for their lives or tried to help others, many of whom were terribly burned. Isolated on an island, help would have to arrive by water. With just a small staff on hand, prison officials ordered prisoners be released to help the victims. Around 50 inmates rushed to help pull passengers from the wreckage.

Dazed survivors were taken wherever there was room; Lowe recalled a pianist with burned hands being brought into the chapel. Some were brought into the prison, where inmates peered through the bars at prone passengers laid out on stretchers.

Deputy Fire Chief Richard A. Denahan was on the Triborough Bridge when he heard about the crash on the radio and drove straight to a ferry landing, arriving at Rikers Island within a half hour to help crews on the ground.

The plane would burn for nearly two hours, leaving behind a smoking hull. Eventually, an investigation would decide that pilot error had caused the crash.

An aerial view of Rikers Island.
An aerial view of Rikers Island. Russ Nelson/CC BY-SA 2.0

It was a frightening time for air travel. Just one month earlier, on January 31, 1957 a passenger plane in California manned by a crew of four had taken off for a test flight and collided in mid-air with a fighter jet. The wreckage rained down on Pacoima Junior High School, killing two students instantly. A third student later died of their injuries. After the crash on Rikers Island, the press would obsess over stories of near-misses.

There was the 62-year-old baker, Ben Opatowsky, who insisted on sitting next to an emergency door, even though his wife, Yetta, wanted to sit further back on the plane. Upon impact, he pushed open the door and “grabbed his wife by the hair and pulled her onto the wing, from where they leaped onto the ground.” There was Joan Sanger and her three-year-old daughter Mindy, who both had the bad luck to be taking their inaugural flight, and the flight attendant on the brink of retirement. LIFE magazine recorded the story of Robert Selmonsky, who dropped his pregnant wife and two year old son off for their flight, despite his misgivings about the snowstorm. As he drove away from the airport, he saw the explosion in the sky. (Both survived.) As the Times interviewed the badly burned pianist, Charles Naylor, his wife declared that she had had a premonition of doom. “My intuitions were so right, weren’t they, dear?,” she said. “That’s what is so frightening.”

Eventually every survivor was plucked from the island and ferried back to shore. A couple of months later, some of the prisoners who had helped save their lives would also board a ship to the mainland.

”We want to show society and the inmates that we are just as quick to reward and show appreciation for noble works as we are to punish for evil deeds,” Anna M. Kross, Commissioner of Corrections, told the Times. On March 8, 1957 11 men were freed as a reward for their rescue efforts. She refused to reveal their names, insisting that “publicity would have a detrimental effect upon them.” A few weeks later, the Times reported that the governor had commuted 11 more sentences, and that 46 sentences had so far been reduced.

Mark Kronen was only six weeks old when the plane crashed. An inmate discovered him buried in snow, and brought the infant inside.

“He saved my life, no question about it,” Kronen told The New York Post. “I probably would’ve died if he hadn’t of found me.” Kronen doesn’t know the name of the man who saved him.

The disaster captured the popular imagination for a period, even producing a TV dramatization that the Times declared “occasionally effective,” and then faded from memory. A mere day after the tragedy, even the lucky baker, Ben Opatowsky was making plans to resume his travels.

“We’re still going to Florida,” he said, “But it will be by train.”

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May 1, 2017 at 02:03PM

The Great Salt Lake’s Mercury Mystery

The Great Salt Lake’s Mercury Mystery

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article-image

The Great Salt Lake’s water is full of salt and minerals—and a serious dose of mercury. Most of that toxic metal was deposited naturally by the atmosphere, but thanks to bacteria and an engineering project, most of it ended up concentrated at the bottom of the lake in the form of particularly nasty methylmercury. But five years after the methylmercury was first documented, it appears to be gone, without any warning or cleanup efforts. Now scientists want to know where it all went.

What they do know is how the mercury got to the bottom of the lake in the first place. Elemental mercury, the form found in older thermometers, drifts in on dust particles. It is converted to methylmercury by microbes, particularly when they’re cut off from oxygen somehow. In the Great Salt Lake, this happened when a rock-and-dirt railroad causeway was constructed across the lake in the 1950s. Rivers flow into the southern arm of the lake, diluting the salt, while the northern half of the lake is much saltier and pinker (thanks to algae). Just two culverts allowed the two sides to mix, and when the salty, dense northern water flows south, it tends to settle at the bottom.

That dense water cuts the bottom-dwelling microbes off from oxygen, which causes them to crank out the sulfide that makes the lake stink of rotten eggs—and to convert mercury to methylmercury. Scientists found high levels of methylmercury in the deep briny layer in 2010, and biologists noticed high levels of mercury in ducks on the lake around the same time.

article-image

But when scientists sampled the deep water again in 2015, they found the amount of toxic mercury had dropped by 88 percent. The mercury’s disappearance is a mystery. Scientists think the microbes might be making less, in part because the culverts were closed in 2013, but that doesn’t quite explain what happened to the methylmercury that was there before. And it also doesn’t mean the ducks are free and clear—the toxic metal is still found in carcasses on the lake’s shores. In the meantime, scientists hope the opening of a new culvert in 2016 will provide some clues in the poisonous case.

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May 1, 2017 at 02:03PM

Itineraries: Security Line Blues? Maybe Some Cool Jazz Will Help

Itineraries: Security Line Blues? Maybe Some Cool Jazz Will Help

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For much of the year, several musical groups perform weekly, but during South by Southwest in March, that number swelled to more than 20, said Michael Pennock, the music coordinator for the city’s aviation department.

The city aviation department; Delaware North Companies, a food service and hospitality company based in Buffalo; and Pepsi underwrite the program. The musicians are paid $120 for two 50-minute sets on four smaller stages or $100 per musician for up to five musicians on a main stage on the secure side of the airport.

For a similar program at Nashville International Airport, Music in the Terminal, 80 to 100 bands perform each year on four stages. Last year, Pittsburgh International Airport began hosting two performances a month in the baggage claim area. Houston Airport System created a performance series, Harmony in the Air, with rotating soloists, including classical music and jazz, at William P. Hobby Airport beginning in 2015 and George Bush Intercontinental Airport in 2016. San Diego Airport recently instituted a paid performing arts residency. This year’s winner, TranscenDance, began performances there last month.

Photo

The Houston Airport System started Harmony in the Air, its performance series, at Hobby Airport in 2015, and expanded it to George Bush Intercontinental Airport last year.

Credit
Todd Spoth for The New York Times

The idea is not a new one: After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Portland International Airport in Oregon began hosting musical performances by volunteer musicians and now has 65 performances a week.

The airports’ arrangements with musicians vary. Most pay the performers, although rates may depend on experience, the size of the group and even the difficulty of the genre. Funding comes from a combination of sources. An airport authority may join forces with a corporate partner or a state or municipal arts commission. Houston Airport System has an enterprise fund for operations, maintenance and capital improvements.

While passengers say they appreciate the unexpected interludes, and musicians’ earnings and fan bases may receive a lift from the programs, airports’ decisions to offer performing arts are largely for their own benefit, said Steven A. Carvell, a professor at the Cornell University School of Hotel Administration.

“Arts are one of the few things an airport authority can do to control the traveler experience,” he said. “They take the traveler out of the space they are in, so they are not attending to their anxiety.”

A potential for increased profits may also factor into that decision. In airports where entertainment is offered in areas past security lines, the music gives passengers a reason to linger near shops and food and beverage concessions, and to make purchases.

A report released in March by the Airports Council International-North America, a group in Washington representing airport owners and aviation-related businesses, said that airports estimated they would need almost $100 billion for capital projects over the next five years. Right now, they can fund only about half that on their own.

“Music provides a better passenger experience and encourages people to arrive earlier,” said Darren Perry, a managing director in the aviation and travel practice at L.E.K. Consulting. “The earlier they arrive, the more money they spend. The money could be used for any number of things, from improving the facilities to making the facilities more comfortable.”

Photo

While entertaining travelers is part of the rationale for airport performances, the possibiity of enhanced revenue also is a factor. The music gives passengers a reason to linger near shops, bars and restaurants, and to make purchases.

Credit
Todd Spoth for The New York Times

Some passengers, like Donna Seymour, an assistant vice president and account executive at a title insurance company who lives in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., agree. Ms. Seymour said that hearing a blues guitarist when she arrived at the Nashville International Airport recently “set the mood for the trip.”

And a performance may reach listeners beyond its in-person audience. Sharjeel Ahsan, a certified public accountant in Houston who said he traveled about six times a year for business, was walking through Hobby Airport in February when he heard strains of classical music.

Before getting something to eat and continuing to his gate, he stopped for about 15 minutes to hear the Apollo Chamber Players. He recorded the segment on his phone and still listens to it. Later, he said, he told his colleagues about his encounter.

Matthew J. Detrick, a violinist and artistic director for the Apollo Chamber Players, said that the airport gig had helped improve the group’s performances. “It teaches us to break down barriers between audience and performer,” he said.

Maricela Kruseman, the performing arts program manager for the Houston Airport System who books talent, said that the audition process was competitive. Musicians are expected to have a college degree in music, five years of experience, two professional and two personal references, and must be performing in Houston. (Currently 10 groups perform at two Houston airports.) Other airports have their own criteria; a common requirement is for musicians to reside and have performing experience in a specific city.

Ms. Kruseman said that she had recently moved some of the performances at Bush Intercontinental to Terminal D, where passengers are expected to arrive three hours ahead for international flights. Concerts are scheduled to lead up to afternoon departures.

For all its entertainment value, music can only go so far in easing passengers’ stress. Barbara E. Lichman, a lawyer specializing in aviation at Buchalter, a law firm in Irvine, Calif., said that the airlines and the Transportation Security Administration needed to closely examine their contributions to travelers’ anxiety. She pointed to cramped and overcrowded airplanes and what she considered illogical parameters for T.S.A. searches.

“Fix the problems in the industry and don’t coat them over with icing like music,” she said.

Still, Ms. Kruseman said, the comment cards she receives are positive. One called a performance “a soothing touch of hospitality to my trip.”

Continue reading the main story

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May 1, 2017 at 02:03PM

A New Look for the World’s Chubbiest Airbus

A New Look for the World’s Chubbiest Airbus

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Both Boeing and Airbus fly specially modified aircraft to carry parts for their next-generation aircraft such as the 787 Dreamliner or the A350 from manufacturers to the assembly line.

Boeing’s 747 LCF Dreamlifter and Airbus’ A300-600ST “Beluga” are both derived from existing aircraft types and resemble a (very) chubby relative. Though the Dreamlifter’s cargo hold is bigger than the Beluga’s, both are large enough to fit wings and significant sections of fuselages inside their gargantuan cargo holds. These special aircraft can deliver aircraft components without having to risk putting them on freight trains or break them up and ship them on trucks. Both planes are unique (fewer than 10 have been built across both companies), but while the Dreamlifter looks a lot like a chubby 747-400, the Beluga resembles, well, a Beluga whale.

BelugaXL

For some time, Airbus has been seeking better fuel efficiency and capability in its cargo-hauling giant. The new model, based on an A330-200, is slightly longer and wider than the A300-derived model, with more powerful engines, capable of lifting over six tons more than the previous iteration. This means the new Beluga can carry two A350-style wings, as opposed to just one with the old model. Entry into service is slated for 2019, and Airbus expects to replace the five existing Beluga planes soon after.

The funny thing about the Beluga is that it’s always been self-aware, so to speak. The airframe looks like a whale, and Airbus didn’t hold back from formally naming it after one. As part of a brand initiative, Airbus asked its employees to vote on a specialty livery for the first of its new airplanes. Employees chose their favorite from six different designs. “Smiling BelugaXL,” garnering over 40% of the vote, emerged victorious, complete with Beluga whale eyes and a huge grin. Though some think this plane is ugly, you can’t deny that it doesn’t look friendly.

Have you seen either of these behemoths in person? Do you like the speciality livery?

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May 1, 2017 at 01:53PM

Airlines Say They’ll Try Harder to Do Better — Skift Business Traveler

Airlines Say They’ll Try Harder to Do Better — Skift Business Traveler

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Spirit Airlines

Interior of a Spirit Airlines plane. The airline’s CEO recently stated that the carrier had room to improve. Spirit Airlines

Skift Take: Paying employees more, apologizing for a poor product: This is the season for resetting passenger expectations at airlines.

— Grant Martin

What to Know Now

We are impressed that we just made it through a weekend without some social media-fueled airline outrage. From dragged passengers to weaponized strollers to dead giant rabbits, it’s been an interesting few weeks.

But last week ended on two notes that, while they may have been informed by the outrages, weren’t about PR-friendly responses to problems. The first was American Airlines’ move to give some of its employees raises outside of the normal labor negotiation period. CEO Doug Parker told investors and analysts that the move “might surprise and even dismay some of you because it adds costs to our airline,” but employees, and the passengers who will encounter much better compensated employees, will be happy.

Over at Spirit, CEO Bob Fornaro admitted that his airline has long been synonymous with both cheap airfares and a totally crap passenger experience. He promised on his company’s first quarter earnings call that “friendly service” is coming soon.

We’ll believe it when we see it. Actually, someone will have to tell us about it because we try to avoid Spirit at all costs.

Social Quote of the Day

15-hour flight. No recline & next to the toilet. Booked months ago. For this, we pay our corporate travel agent a $75 booking fee.

@mccoubr | Canuck geek dad. Public intellectual/idiot. Freelance h0t taeks CAD5 /column-inch

AIRLINES

Alaska Air Focuses on Customer Experience and Loyalty as it Integrates Virgin America: It’s good to see Alaska still placing a major emphasis on customer satisfaction after its Virgin America acquisition. Read more at Skift

Flyers Shouldn’t Expect $10,000 When Bumped From a United Airlines Flight: If you’re suddenly hatching schemes to snare ten large by purchasing a ticket on a peak Monday morning or Friday night flight, you may want to hold off. There is no “$10,000 jackpot” at the airport waiting to be hit. Not really. Read more at Skift

United Ends Cooperation Agreements With 5 Middle East Airlines: United Airlines is canceling basic cooperation agreements with five Middle East airlines, including Qatar Airways and Emirates Airline, as the Chicago-based carrier continues to complain that the largest airlines in the region compete unfairly by taking massive government subsidies. Read more at Skift

Freddie Awards Pick the Year’s Best Traveler Loyalty Programs: In the poll, 4.2 million frequent travelers worldwide ranked loyalty programs. The poll comes just as a few U.S. major airlines have overhauled their frequent flyer rewards. We were curious at the results: Would the move from a miles-flown to a revenue-based model make the legacy players less popular. The short answer, it turns out, is no. Read more at Skift

Airports

The Paparazzi-Proof Airline Terminal: The new Private Suite at LAX offers a high-end, backdoor way for VIP travelers to get onto and off of commercial flights. Read more at The Wall Street Journal

The 5 Most Ridiculous Items Passengers Wanted to Carry On in April: Every week, the TSA blogs about items (mostly weapons) that agents have confiscated at airports around the country, and the agency posts some of the crazier ones on its Instagram page. Read more at The Points Guy

Tech

Lyft Is Beating Its Financial Goals But Faces Long Road to Profitability: Lyft Inc.’s bookings and ridership surged in the first quarter, suggesting the company benefited from user defections and management turmoil at larger rival Uber Technologies Inc. Read more at Skift

Emirates CEO Still Perplexed at U.S. Laptop Ban: The chairman and CEO of Dubai’s long-haul carrier Emirates said Tuesday he “can’t dig into somebody’s mind” to understand why the U.S. instituted a ban on laptops and other personal electronics in carry-on luggage from 10 cities in Muslim-majority countries. Read more at Skift

Amadeus Tests Virtual Reality as a Travel Booking Option: Navitaire, a reservation system for low-cost carriers that travel technology giant Amadeus acquired in 2015, is debuting a “proof-of-concept” of how travel searching and booking could work using virtual reality headsets. Read more at Skift

Hotels

Airbnb Debuts Business Travel Search Tool: Since debuting in 2008, Airbnb Inc. has marketed itself to adventurous vacationers looking for unique and cheap accommodations. Next week, the San Francisco-based travel upstart will get a bit more buttoned up. Read more at Skift

Hilton Launches Points Pooling for Its Honors Loyalty Program: Hilton, which overhauled its Honors Loyalty Program earlier this year, launched a new tool for members to share points this week. Called Points Pooling, the program allows up to 11 members of the program to pool points into one account, potentially making it easier to book high-ticket items like free award nights or swanky Hilton Experiences. Read more at Skift

Wyndham Is Finally Harnessing Its Global Scale Via Loyalty: Wyndham Worldwide’s first quarter earnings were, as CEO Stephen P. Holmes noted, “right in line with our expectations” and those expectations support a major strategy designed to synergize all three of the company’s businesses: hotels, timeshares, and vacation rentals. Read more at Skift

Starwood Founder Launches New Extended Stay Brand Uptown Suites: The select-service, extended stay portion of the hospitality industry is getting a new brand from the founder and creator behind W Hotels and, most recently, luxury eco-boutique brand 1 Hotels. Read more at Skift

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May 1, 2017 at 01:07PM

Ronald Reagan National Airport’s Historic Terminal A in Arlington County, Virginia

Ronald Reagan National Airport’s Historic Terminal A in Arlington County, Virginia

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In the early days of commercial air travel, planes in and out of the U.S. capital had to rely on a traffic cop. It was the 1930s, and the single, unpaved runway at the woefully inadequate Washington-Hoover Airport was cut in two by a major boulevard. To let the planes take off and land, the cars had to be stopped by a police officer swinging a lantern.

By the end of the decade, Washington-Hoover had outlived its brief usefulness, and surrendered to the wrecking ball. In 1941, just down the road, Washington’s brand new airport opened its Terminal A.

For the next five-and-a-half decades, Terminal A serviced the District with style, grace, and just a touch of travel romance. Even though its art deco ticket counters and passenger gates no longer cater to travelers (that all moved in the late 1990s to the modern Terminals B and C), it is still open to visitors as part of the airport’s history, and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The old waiting area has floor-to-ceiling windows that look out over the runways, and several of the original architectural details remain in place. There are exhibits of long-gone airlines, and the curved back wall, where the ticket counters use to be, now displays old photographs and a large commemorative plaque of the building’s 1940 groundbreaking.

In 1998 the airport changed it official name to Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, and there is a large bronze sculpture of the former president as you drive up. But old habits die hard, and to most Washingtonians it’s still just called “National.” No cops with lanterns, though, are needed to mind the modern runways.

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May 1, 2017 at 01:06PM

Golden Driller in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Golden Driller in Tulsa, Oklahoma

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Golden Driller

In Tulsa, Oklahoma, there stands a 76-foot statue of a bare-chested golden man with a belt reading “TULSA” on the buckle. Known as the Golden Driller, it is a 60-year-old monument to honor the workers of the petroleum industry in the former "oil capital of the world."

The International Petroleum Exposition, a fair exhibiting the latest innovations in oil technology, was held in Tulsa various times throughout the mid-20th century. The massive Golden Driller statue was created for the expo’s 1953 edition, wearing a tin helmet on his head and resting his right hand on an oil derrick relocated from a depleted oil field.

The statue became so popular among oil enthusiasts that it was temporarily recreated in 1959 and permanently erected seven years later after an anatomical redesign and a boost in height. But by 1979, the Golden Driller was abandoned by its manufacturer, the Mid-Continent Supply Company, and was slated for demolition as neglect and bullet holes destroyed what visual elegance it once had. The city of Tulsa came to save the day, preserving the Golden Driller and making it the official state monument of Oklahoma.

In addition to being the Oklahoma State Monument, the Golden Driller is also the fifth tallest statue in the United States and has been named one of the top ten “quirkiest destinations” in the U.S. And it won’t be coming down soon. It is built to withstand the state’s vicious 200 mph tornadoes, and its mustard paint is said to last 100 years.

Travel

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May 1, 2017 at 01:06PM

Ronald Reagan National Airport’s Historic Terminal A in Arlington County, Virginia

Ronald Reagan National Airport’s Historic Terminal A in Arlington County, Virginia

http://ift.tt/2poyjom

In the early days of commercial air travel, planes in and out of the U.S. capital had to rely on a traffic cop. It was the 1930s, and the single, unpaved runway at the woefully inadequate Washington-Hoover Airport was cut in two by a major boulevard. To let the planes take off and land, the cars had to be stopped by a police officer swinging a lantern.

By the end of the decade, Washington-Hoover had outlived its brief usefulness, and surrendered to the wrecking ball. In 1941, just down the road, Washington’s brand new airport opened its Terminal A.

For the next five-and-a-half decades, Terminal A serviced the District with style, grace, and just a touch of travel romance. Even though its art deco ticket counters and passenger gates no longer cater to travelers (that all moved in the late 1990s to the modern Terminals B and C), it is still open to visitors as part of the airport’s history, and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The old waiting area has floor-to-ceiling windows that look out over the runways, and several of the original architectural details remain in place. There are exhibits of long-gone airlines, and the curved back wall, where the ticket counters use to be, now displays old photographs and a large commemorative plaque of the building’s 1940 groundbreaking.

In 1998 the airport changed it official name to Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, and there is a large bronze sculpture of the former president as you drive up. But old habits die hard, and to most Washingtonians it’s still just called “National.” No cops with lanterns, though, are needed to mind the modern runways.

Travel

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May 1, 2017 at 01:01PM

Golden Driller in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Golden Driller in Tulsa, Oklahoma

http://ift.tt/2pPTlxD

Golden Driller

In Tulsa, Oklahoma, there stands a 76-foot statue of a bare-chested golden man with a belt reading “TULSA” on the buckle. Known as the Golden Driller, it is a 60-year-old monument to honor the workers of the petroleum industry in the former "oil capital of the world."

The International Petroleum Exposition, a fair exhibiting the latest innovations in oil technology, was held in Tulsa various times throughout the mid-20th century. The massive Golden Driller statue was created for the expo’s 1953 edition, wearing a tin helmet on his head and resting his right hand on an oil derrick relocated from a depleted oil field.

The statue became so popular among oil enthusiasts that it was temporarily recreated in 1959 and permanently erected seven years later after an anatomical redesign and a boost in height. But by 1979, the Golden Driller was abandoned by its manufacturer, the Mid-Continent Supply Company, and was slated for demolition as neglect and bullet holes destroyed what visual elegance it once had. The city of Tulsa came to save the day, preserving the Golden Driller and making it the official state monument of Oklahoma.

In addition to being the Oklahoma State Monument, the Golden Driller is also the fifth tallest statue in the United States and has been named one of the top ten “quirkiest destinations” in the U.S. And it won’t be coming down soon. It is built to withstand the state’s vicious 200 mph tornadoes, and its mustard paint is said to last 100 years.

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May 1, 2017 at 12:54PM

WestJet gets NDC thumbs-up, and more…

WestJet gets NDC thumbs-up, and more…

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This is a roundup of product news and announcements for travel distribution in May 2017.

Monday 1 May 2017:

WestJet NDC thumbs-up

  • WestJet received IATA’s New Distribution Capability level 2 certification, confirming the carrier’s ability to send and receive NDC messages. It is the first Canadian airline to do so.

NB: Travel distribution image via Pixabay.

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May 1, 2017 at 12:17PM