Singapore Air Wants Some Flight Attendants To Take Unpaid Leave

Singapore Air Wants Some Flight Attendants To Take Unpaid Leave

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Kyunghee Park  / Bloomberg

Singapore Air is asking some of its 8,300 cabin crew to take unpaid leave starting this September. Pictured is a Singapore Air jet. Kyunghee Park / Bloomberg

Skift Take: Singapore Air is stuck between a rock and a hard place – it recently went on a plane-buying spree to help fuel its growth and remain competitive but that came at the expense of its employees.

— Dan Peltier

Singapore Airlines Ltd. is offering three months of voluntary unpaid leave to cabin crew as it seeks to cut costs amid rising competition in the region.

The carrier is asking some of its flight attendants to take the leave from September, it said in an emailed response to questions Friday. The airline had 8,356 cabin crew at the end of March, according to its annual report.

“Having temporary surpluses or deficits of cabin crew is not unusual due to the nature of our business,” a Singapore Air spokesman said. “This voluntary scheme over a specific period of time is to ensure that we efficiently manage crew resources and operational requirements. The intention is to offer it from time to time going forward.”

Singapore Air is in the midst of a review of its business amid intensifying competition from Middle East airlines and budget carriers, with Chief Executive Officer Goh Choon Phong saying in June that it may include a headcount reduction. The carrier returned to profit last quarter after posting its first loss since 2014 in the first three months of the year.

The Singaporean carrier isn’t the only airline that’s trying to reduce staff costs. Emirates is letting go of dozens of employees, including senior cabin crew and support department workforce, as the Gulf carrier continues a push to streamline after years of rapid growth, people with knowledge of the matter said last month.

Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. said in May that it would eliminate 600 jobs in Hong Kong as part of the biggest business revamp in two decades as it slipped into a loss for the first time in eight years.

 

This article was written by Kyunghee Park from Bloomberg and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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August 4, 2017 at 07:06PM

Stara Elektrarna (The Old Power Station) in Ljubljana, Slovenia

Stara Elektrarna (The Old Power Station) in Ljubljana, Slovenia

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Stara Elektrarna.

Stara Elektrarna, the old power station in Ljubljana, has gone through plenty of modifications, upgrades, and enlargements since it was built in 1898. It was the capital city’s first power plant and continued producing electricity until the 1940s when its obsolete technology was replaced by a heating plant on the edge of town.

Parts of the plant were brought back into service in the 1960s, and today it continues to produce a third of the city’s electricity. But it also serves a more creative, modern function: as an authentic industrial background for the performing arts in Slovenia.

Artists began displaying work in the unused parts of the power station building in the 1980s, and in 1998 the Ministry of Culture began renovations to make those areas even more conducive to the arts. Bunker, a nonprofit performing arts organization, was awarded management of those parts of the building in 2004 by the city, which was looking to remedy the lack of rehearsal spaces in the area.

The 2004, Mladi Levi (Young Lions) festival of contemporary performing arts marked the official opening of the program. Bunker’s program for Stara Elektrarna divides the power station into three sections: rehearsals and residencies, educational workshops and seminars, and performances. It hosts theatre and dance productions, concerts, and other events backdropped the industrial space. The plant’s chimney, over 300-feet tall, features a gallery, alongside equipment for monitoring coal exhaust.

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August 4, 2017 at 07:06PM

WildSnow Mod — Keen On Quinoa Version 2

WildSnow Mod — Keen On Quinoa Version 2

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Post by WildSnow.com blogger

| August 4, 2017  
   

Summer harvest.

Summer harvest.

Like breathing fresh mountain air, modifying almost everything we touch is part of life here at WildSnow.

I planted cilantro in my garden this spring and the fresh sprigs made Keen on Quinoa Salad taste especially good.

After a few weeks, the cilantro bolted during a period of unseasonably hot weather. The leaves were bitter after that so I ripped out the plants and sowed seeds for a fall harvest. Next time I made my weekly batch of quinoa, I seasoned it with what I had on hand. It turned out better than ever. A successful episode of modifications in the kitchen!

A refreshing, light, nutritious salad that tastes best served cold on a hot summer day; I eat it almost every day.

Keen on Quinoa 2

2 cups quinoa
4 cups water
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup lemon juice
4 teaspoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 small onion

Rinse quinoa in cold water. In a pot, bring quinoa and water to rolling boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, turn off burner and let stand, covered, until cool. Place cool pot in refrigerator until cold (overnight is fine).

Next, I use my handy food processor: chop onion, blend in olive oil, lemon juice, cumin, salt, and red pepper flakes. Pour over chilled quinoa, mix well and serve.

Keeps well in refrigerator. I often make a batch and we eat it all week long.

I like to keep my kitchen counters uncluttered but a few appliances have earned their place. We use a blender often for smoothies and I like the efficiency of an electric slicer/chopper for veggie prep. I found a blender/food processor combo tool that does both; it gets top marks in my book.

Enjoy!

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August 4, 2017 at 07:02PM

Primeval Forest National Park in Nassau, The Bahamas

Primeval Forest National Park in Nassau, The Bahamas

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One of the many sinkholes in the park.

The Primeval Forest National Park is a geological and botanical gem, tucked away in the bustling, commercial capital of the Bahamas. The ancient hardwood forest, which is largely untouched by humans, is one of the best preserved plots of old-growth woodland in the country.

From the early 1700s up into the 1970s, the logging industry within the Bahamas led to the mass exploitation of large hardwood trees. A shift in logging licenses, plus an increased awareness of the environmental importance of living, standing trees, finally slowed the culling. 

Pericles Maillis, the former president of the British National Trust, stumbled upon the undisturbed patch of forest that would one day become the Primeval Forest National Park as a boy. In the late ’90s, he led the initiative to protect the land. It’s a small park, only about 7.5 acres in total, but it serves as a mini time capsule of Nassau’s former evergreen, tropical environment.

The forest is filled with an array of pines, hemlocks, mosses, termite mounds, and even a fossilized conch shell. But the star attraction is the sinkholes. The impressive limestone caverns, some of which are up to 50 feet long and 30 feet deep, are scattered throughout the park. The sinkholes occur because of the abundance of water that causes the limestone, a highly porous rock, to weather. They’re easily accessed via a series of boardwalks, steps, and bridges. 

The park, which also has a small visitor’s center full of geological facts, was established in 2002.

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August 4, 2017 at 06:06PM

The Ancient Glass-Blowing Technique That Was Kept Secret for Centuries

The Ancient Glass-Blowing Technique That Was Kept Secret for Centuries

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For centuries, Venetian glassblowing was world famous. By the 13th century, glass had become a primary export for Venice. Everyone wanted it—and everyone wanted to know how it was made.

But Venice was intent to keep the process secret.

In 1271, a law banned foreign workers from participating in the glass industry, ostensibly so that only Venetian citizens would know the technique. Even that was not enough. Twenty years later, Venice required that all glass production move to the more isolated islands of Murano. Though the reason given was that glassblowing furnaces presented a fire hazard, the law was almost certainly about protecting Venetian trade secrets, as a subsequent ordinance demonstrates: in 1295, Venetian glassblowers were entirely banned from traveling abroad. Disobeying came with the risk of death.

The video above depicts William Gudenrath, a glassblower and scholar who, after years of research, has demonstrated how Venetians made their beloved glass.

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August 4, 2017 at 06:06PM

Primeval Forest National Park in Nassau, The Bahamas

Primeval Forest National Park in Nassau, The Bahamas

http://ift.tt/2vxdH0R

One of the many sinkholes in the park.

The Primeval Forest National Park is a geological and botanical gem, tucked away in the bustling, commercial capital of the Bahamas. The ancient hardwood forest, which is largely untouched by humans, is one of the best preserved plots of old-growth woodland in the country.

From the early 1700s up into the 1970s, the logging industry within the Bahamas led to the mass exploitation of large hardwood trees. A shift in logging licenses, plus an increased awareness of the environmental importance of living, standing trees, finally slowed the culling. 

Pericles Maillis, the former president of the British National Trust, stumbled upon the undisturbed patch of forest that would one day become the Primeval Forest National Park as a boy. In the late ’90s, he led the initiative to protect the land. It’s a small park, only about 7.5 acres in total, but it serves as a mini time capsule of Nassau’s former evergreen, tropical environment.

The forest is filled with an array of pines, hemlocks, mosses, termite mounds, and even a fossilized conch shell. But the star attraction is the sinkholes. The impressive limestone caverns, some of which are up to 50 feet long and 30 feet deep, are scattered throughout the park. The sinkholes occur because of the abundance of water that causes the limestone, a highly porous rock, to weather. They’re easily accessed via a series of boardwalks, steps, and bridges. 

The park, which also has a small visitor’s center full of geological facts, was established in 2002.

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August 4, 2017 at 06:02PM

Tourism and Economic Impact of Republican Convention — Even Researchers Can’t Agree

Tourism and Economic Impact of Republican Convention — Even Researchers Can’t Agree

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Erik Drost  / Flickr

Researchers disagree on the economic impact of the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio. Pictured is the Cleveland sign at Edgewater Park. Erik Drost / Flickr

Skift Take: One of the other short-term impacts that Cleveland’s tourism industry must address is whether it wants to be known as a bastion of conservative values. It’s usually a bad idea to mix politics and destination marketing.

— Dan Peltier

Economic impact studies sought by the host committee for last summer’s Republican National Convention in Cleveland have reached differing conclusions about how much the city and region gained in the short term.

Local organizers announced the findings at a news conference Thursday in Cleveland. They say Cleveland’s image received a long-term positive boost because the convention that nominated President Donald Trump went smoothly and was free of the chaos and problems some people predicted.

A study by Tourism Economics says 48,000 people visited Cleveland during the July 2016 convention, spending $110 million with a total economic impact of $188 million. Cleveland State University researchers say 44,000 people visited, spending $67 million with a total impact of $142 million.

Officials disagree with CSU’s numbers, saying Tourism Economics has studied previous conventions.

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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August 4, 2017 at 06:02PM

News wrap: Scientists explore long-lost continent, eight-year-old girl climbs Kilimanjaro and more

News wrap: Scientists explore long-lost continent, eight-year-old girl climbs Kilimanjaro and more

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From an expedition to explore a long-lost eighth continent to a NASA job opening that involves protecting earth from ‘alien contamination’, here’s your wrap of adventure news that has people talking this week.

Geologists this week set sail to study the submerged continent of Zealandia, of which New Zealand and New Caledonia are the only visible pieces of land. The expedition is the first of its kind and hopes to shed light on the formation of the 90 per cent submerged, 4.9-million-square-kilometer (3-million-square-mile) continent, which lies off the east coast of Australia. Zealandia was formed some 85 million years ago but it wasn’t until 50 million years ago that what is now known as New Zealand was pushed above the water. The expedition crew will spend two months at sea.

An eight-year-old girl has become the youngest female ever to climb all 19,341 feet of Mount Kilimanjaro. Roxy Getter, from Florida, completed the hike last week with her brother (who is only 10) and her parents. Only an estimated 66 per cent of the 25,000 adventurers who climb the mountain each year make it to the top, and–believe it or not–the trip was the first time either of the Getter kids had ever been camping.

NASA has this week posted a job ad for a ‘Planetary Protection Officer’. Responsibilities include protecting earth from ‘alien contamination’ and helping ensure humans don’t contaminate other planets. It’s paying up to $187,000 for the right candidate, who will have to ensure that any space mission has a less than 1-in-10,000 chance of contaminating a foreign planet. As you can imagine, the required skills and qualifications are out of this world, but you can apply here if you think you have what it takes.

An 800-year-old statue has been discovered in Cambodia at the Angkor Wat temple complex. The new (old) statue–thought to be of a guard–is two meters (6.5 feet) tall and is said to date back to the 12th century. The statue would have once held pride of place over the entrance of an ancient hospital, reports the Independent. Looting of the Angkor complex over the years has made new discoveries rare.

National Geographic have just revealed their 2017 travel photographer of the year. Volcano photographer Sergio Tapiro took out the top spot with his awe-inspiring photo of Mexico’s Mount Colima, taken against the backdrop of a starry sky and caught mid-eruption. “This picture is a gift that nature has given to me,” Tapiro told National Geographic. “When I saw the camera display I was shocked—I didn’t believe it.” Sergio has been photographing volcanoes for 15 years but says his winning photo was a once-in-a-lifetime capture.

Elsewhere, Easyjet passengers waiting to fly from Zante, Greece to Gatwick, London, experienced a two-day delay thanks to efforts to protect a turtle population; the ‘world’s best hotdog stand’–which has held court in the same spot in Reykjavík, Iceland, for 80 years–has been forced to move as a result of overtourism; and a Boeing Dreamliner plane just spent 13 hours drawing an enormous self-portrait over the United States, because of course it has.

The post News wrap: Scientists explore long-lost continent, eight-year-old girl climbs Kilimanjaro and more appeared first on Adventure.com.

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August 4, 2017 at 05:10PM

Poopoo Land in Seoul, South Korea

Poopoo Land in Seoul, South Korea

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Vast numbers of neon poos await visitors to Poopoo Land.

Seoul is home to a number of wonderful free museums that tell the fascinating stories of Korea’s history. But Poopoo Land is the only attraction to help you find out what your flatulent sounds say about you.

Poopoo Land is a bright, whacky exhibit that doesn’t waste an inch of its three-floor space, but dives deep into the universe and science of poop, farts, and anything in between. It’s an Instagram gold mine—you and your companion can pose on matching toilets, get up close and personal with a urinal, or see a display of many different kinds of toilet paper.

Fittingly for a place called Poopoo Land, it is the exit which is most memorable. After going through a rather intense dark room designed to mimic the digestive system, you exit via an "extreme slide." While not particularly long, the slide is very steep, and to prevent friction, you’ll be given shoe covers and, if you have short sleeves or a skirt, over sleeves and special over pants (which the attendant gleefully calls "poopoo pants"). Used poopoo pants are deposited in a brown sack at the end of the slide.

On the upper levels of the same complex as Poopoo Land you’ll also find a poo-themed cafe, which offers such appetizing delicacies as curry served in a toilet-shaped bowl, as well as toilet-themed drinks and desserts. For a more affordable option, check out the stall selling poop emoji-shaped snacks downstairs. If you’re lucky, there may also be a Poopoo pop-up shop on the ground floor to get your own lucky charm.

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August 4, 2017 at 05:06PM

Travel Advisory for Missouri Leaves NAACP and Local Chapter at Odds

Travel Advisory for Missouri Leaves NAACP and Local Chapter at Odds

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Justin Valas  / Flickr

The NAACP’s St. Louis, Missouri chapter is pushing back against the national organization’s move to caution travelers in Missouri about potential civil rights violations. Justin Valas / Flickr

Skift Take: If we’ve learned anything from other states with similar discrimination bills it’s that local economies suffer and many events and conventions pull out in favor of more welcoming and inclusive destinations.

— Dan Peltier

The leader of a St. Louis-area NAACP branch on Thursday pushed back against a travel advisory supported by state and national NAACP members that urge caution while in Missouri over their concerns about whether civil rights will be respected.

At issue is an advisory sent in June by the state NAACP that warns travelers to use “extreme caution” while in Missouri. It cites, among other issues, a new law to raise the standard to prove employment or housing discrimination in court. National delegates also voted in favor of the advisory.

St. Louis County NAACP President Esther Haywood said in a statement that while the local group doesn’t support that law, members are worried a travel advisory could hurt workers in the state.

“The people hurt by the travel advisory are the members of our NAACP community who work across our state in hospitality industry jobs and who have played no role in this legislation,” Haywood said.

On top of the discrimination law, the advisory cited a recent attorney general’s report that shows black Missouri drivers last year were 75 percent more likely to be stopped by police than white drivers.

The Missouri NAACP has fought for months against the discrimination law, arguing it could make it tougher to hold people accountable for harassment and discrimination.

Backers — including Republican Gov. Eric Greitens, who signed the bill in June — argued the change could end “frivolous” lawsuits in the state and said a number of other states and the federal government use a similar standard required to prove discrimination.

Haywood said if the NAACP doesn’t immediately rescind the advisory, it should issue warnings for states with similar laws.

This article was written by Summer Ballentine from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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August 4, 2017 at 05:05PM