Lovers of Valdaro in Mantova, Italy

Lovers of Valdaro in Mantova, Italy

http://ift.tt/2u0FS4J

The eternal lovers of Valdaro.

Arms and legs entwined, the couple lay facing each other, comfortably ensconced in the fetal position. So comfortable, in fact, that they have stayed that way for more than 6,000 years.

In 2007, the near-perfectly preserved Neolithic-era remains of two humans were found in an archaeological site outside the Italian village of Valdaro, locked in an embrace.

Studies show that the pair, one male and one female, were not very old nor very tall at the time of their deaths, estimated as sometime between 4,000 and 5,000 BC. Research puts them between 18 and 20 years, and no more than 5′ 2."

The romantic theory, which is not entirely unlikely, is that a young couple died holding each other on a cold winter night. The more widely accepted hypothesis suggests that they were buried in this position after their death, along with flint implements like arrows, knives, and blades.

The unusual double burial and tender positioning caused a stir when the discovery was made. The archaeologists who uncovered the remains did not want to separate the two, and the skeletons were excavated and preserved along with the block of earth around them. The eternal lovers locked in a hug, can be seen at the Archaeological Museum in Mantua, near where they were found. 

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

August 2, 2017 at 07:09PM

Untapped Staff Reads: New York’s Tradition of Uncapping Fire Hydrants, How Grand Central Terminal Was Saved from Destruction

Untapped Staff Reads: New York’s Tradition of Uncapping Fire Hydrants, How Grand Central Terminal Was Saved from Destruction

http://ift.tt/2uWVR6y


Image via Wikimedia: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

Here’s what the Untapped staff is reading in the HQ today:

  • Subway Etiquette 101: How To Not Be A Jerk On The Train [Gothamist]: The “Summer Of Hell” has been marked by frequent subway delays, ongoing track work, decaying infrastructure, and Governor Cuomo repeatedly pretending he doesn’t control the MTA. It’s not easy commuting every day with the knowledge that every train ride could trap you in a system-wide meltdown, which is why we should all do our part to NOT make it even worse by being rude and gross space invaders.
  • New York’s tradition of uncapping fire hydrants to beat the heat [6sqft]: When temperatures soar, fire hydrants across the city flow freely and not necessarily to put out fires. The practice, commonly known as “uncapping,” has long served as a way for city residents to cool off. Although it is not entirely legal, it is generally tolerated, especially when temperatures climb above 90, and for a number of legitimate reasons.

Today’s popular Untapped Cities reads:

 Linkages

Travel

via Untapped Cities http://ift.tt/16P17aK

August 2, 2017 at 07:07PM

Lovers of Valdaro in Mantova, Italy

Lovers of Valdaro in Mantova, Italy

http://ift.tt/2u0FS4J

The eternal lovers of Valdaro.

Arms and legs entwined, the couple lay facing each other, comfortably ensconced in the fetal position. So comfortable, in fact, that they have stayed that way for more than 6,000 years.

In 2007, the near-perfectly preserved Neolithic-era remains of two humans were found in an archaeological site outside the Italian village of Valdaro, locked in an embrace.

Studies show that the pair, one male and one female, were not very old nor very tall at the time of their deaths, estimated as sometime between 4,000 and 5,000 BC. Research puts them between 18 and 20 years, and no more than 5′ 2."

The romantic theory, which is not entirely unlikely, is that a young couple died holding each other on a cold winter night. The more widely accepted hypothesis suggests that they were buried in this position after their death, along with flint implements like arrows, knives, and blades.

The unusual double burial and tender positioning caused a stir when the discovery was made. The archaeologists who uncovered the remains did not want to separate the two, and the skeletons were excavated and preserved along with the block of earth around them. The eternal lovers locked in a hug, can be seen at the Archaeological Museum in Mantua, near where they were found. 

Travel

via Atlas Obscura http://ift.tt/SEYBhH

August 2, 2017 at 07:03PM

Art Young: A Cartoonist for the Ages

Art Young: A Cartoonist for the Ages

http://ift.tt/2w7jpEw

Political cartoons usually have the shelf life of yogurt, yet many of Art Young’s drawings from the early twentieth century remain fresh and hilariously witty—they seem to have been hatched just this morning. Young, one of the core editors and artists of The Masses, a socialist bohemian publication, didn’t get lost in the trivia of daily news; he kept his eyes on the big drama of the ninety-nine per cent versus the one per cent. A jovial man who even had empathy for his enemies, Young had a winning sense of humor as well as a strong sense of social justice—some of his funniest drawings are about Hell. During the First World War, when Young was tried for treason alongside John Reed and Max Eastman, his colleagues at The Masses, the prosecuting attorney couldn’t help stating, in his otherwise excoriating summation, that “everybody loves Art Young.” A long overdue book celebrating Young’s life and art—edited by Glenn Bray and Frank Young (no relation)—comes out this week, from Fantagraphics.

“Self-Advertising,” undated.

Young caught the essence of tweets a century before the invention of Twitter.

“The Hurry-Up Complex,” the Saturday Evening Post, October 4, 1924.

After The Masses trial, in 1917, Young became too hot for comfort, yet many editors tried to find ways to use his astute and often conceptual cartoons in their mainstream publications. Two “Complex” images were part of a series drawn for the Saturday Evening Post.

“Indecision Complex,” the Saturday Evening Post, September 6, 1924.

“This Complex usually stays right where he is, because he doesn’t know which way to jump. He is the sworn enemy of that positive, Go-Get Complex which is sometimes as destructive to the human conduct as his rival.”

“I Think I’ll Take the Murder,” The New Yorker, June 14, 1930.

Young created several cartoons for The New Yorker.

“Mother, when you were a single girl, didn’t you find it a bore to be a virgin?”, The New Masses, July, 1926.

After the government shut down The Masses, Young contributed to, and helped found, many other radical magazines, including The New Masses, the Communist, usually more dogmatic successor to The Masses.

“The Man Who Was Too Suspicious,” from “Hell Up To Date,” 1892.

Young published three different books inspired by Dante’s “Inferno.” “Hell Up to Date: The Reckless Journey of R. Palasco Drant, Newspaper Correspondent, Through the Infernal Regions, As Reported by Himself” was his first book, published in 1894. Its success led to “Through Hell with Hiprah Hunt,” in 1901.

“The Music in Hell,” from “Art Young’s Inferno,” 1934.

“Art Young’s Inferno: A Journey Through Hell Six Hundred Years After Dante,” published in 1934, is considered one of Young’s masterpieces.

“After One War—They Start Raising Babies for the Next,” undated.

Young’s work often had an antiwar stance.

“Having Their Fling,” The Masses, September, 1917.

This drawing was used as an exhibit in the government’s prosecution of the editors of The Masses under the Espionage Act. They were charged with “conspiracy to obstruct the recruiting and enlistment service of the U.S.” and for the publication of “seditious articles, cartoons and poems.”

“The Age of Advertising,” Puck magazine, undated.

Near the dawn of branded advertising, Young mocked its ubiquity.

“This World of Creepers; Afraid of Themselves and of Others, Afraid of the Almighty, of Life and of Death,” Life, November 14, 1907.

This drawing was originally published in Life, in 1907.

“Trees at Night,” published in 1927, collected of some of Young’s most beautiful and poetic drawings. The series was a forerunner to the conceptual approach to cartoons that blossomed decades later, in the works of artists such as William Steig and Saul Steinberg. Young was inspired while staring at the trees outside his home and studio in rural Bethel, Connecticut. The Bethel Historical Society and Bethel Museum established the Art Young Gallery, to celebrate his life’s work, in 2015.

Travel

via Everything http://ift.tt/2toxdZ0

August 2, 2017 at 06:41PM

Sabre Corp. chief sheds light on where the head count cuts will apply

Sabre Corp. chief sheds light on where the head count cuts will apply

http://ift.tt/2u0u5Dh

Sabre Corp. chief Sean Menke shed some light on the company’s plans to reduce head count in a major realignment of its business.

During Sabre’s second-quarter earnings call, Menke said the company is reducing head count by about 9% globally under a new cost reduction and business alignment initiative.

The plan centers on “what is actually producing and what is not producing,” he said.

While Menke was not specific about where the carving knife would be applied, it was clear that Airline Solutions was near the top of the list.
“Airline Solutions is the one where we probably spent the most amount of time,” he said during the Q&A period.

Airline Solutions, which along with its sister Hospitality Solutions has provided Sabre with good growth numbers in recent years, had a particularly difficult quarter.

Sabre stopped working on the migration of deeply troubled Airberlin to the SabreSonic passenger services system.

The insolvency of Alitalia, another SabreSonic customer, resulted in decreased revenue.

And long-time customer Southwest Airlines migrated its massive domestic system to the Amadeus Altéa PSS — a long expected move, but one that still hurt.

Menke expressed confidence in Sabre’s GDS business and in Hospitality Solutions. He also gave a vote of confidence to SabreSonic.

But other Airline Solutions product portfolios have gotten a bit chubbier than is healthy. “This means shifting focus and resources towards SabreSonic and other core products,” Menke said.

Menke said the company has reduced the management layers in the product and technology group “to improve our product owner’s ability to coordinate with greater speed and efficiency across the company.”

Sabre will pare certain functions in Travel Network and Hospitality Solutions that have become duplicative over the years, due in part to acquisitions.

Corporate staff head count was reduced by 12%, Menke said. The company is eliminating certain activities and focusing more directly on functions that support operational and strategic initiatives.

ported a net loss of $5.4 million for the second quarter, compare to net income of $73 million in second quarter 2016.

The decrease is primarily the result of a $92 million impairment and related charges associated with the Airline Solutions Air Berlin contract and a $25.5 million charge related to the cost reduction and business alignment program.

Airline and Hospitality Solutions revenue grew 7.8%, to $271.8 million.

Revenue from Travel Network, Sabre’s GDS business, grew 6.3%, to $635.6 million.

 

Travel

via Tnooz https://www.tnooz.com

August 2, 2017 at 06:22PM

Chamberlain Freedom Park in Brewer, Maine

Chamberlain Freedom Park in Brewer, Maine

http://ift.tt/2viDs5e

North to Freedom.

On a small hillside in Chamberlain Freedom Park you’ll find a bronze sculpture depicting a slave climbing out of a tunnel. The monument, called North to Freedom, is a memorial to the Underground Railroad, the only official such memorial in Maine.

The tunnel itself had previously been hidden under the historic Holyoke House (which was torn down in 1995), and both the house and tunnel were allegedly part of the secret route used by slaves to escape from the American South into Canada in the 19th century.

The statue is a tribute to the slaves that used the Underground Railroad as well as those who helped and hid them along the way. Though Maine was a free state, it was still illegal for anyone who lived there to aid a runaway slave.

North to Freedom was added to Chamberlain Freedom Park in 2002. The park is named for Civil War hero Brigadier General Joshua Chamberlain, who was born in Brewer, Maine. A statue of the general stands atop this small hill in his hometown, surrounded by commemorative plaques and a monument to the 20th Maine Infantry.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura http://ift.tt/SEYBhH

August 2, 2017 at 06:07PM

Webjet Is Buying JacTravel as Wholesaler Consolidation Intensifies

Webjet Is Buying JacTravel as Wholesaler Consolidation Intensifies

http://ift.tt/2uklaMg

Webjet

Webjet is buying UK competitor JacTravel. Webjet has a large consumer business but is becoming a leading wholesaler, as well. Webjet

Skift Take: In a short period, the number of companies at the top of the business-to-business travel market has shrunk dramatically. The deal continues Webjet’s transition from a regionally focused consumer travel company to a global travel business; other acquisitions will follow.

— Patrick Whyte

The race for consolidation in hotel-wholesaler sector has taken another step forward with the news that Australia-based Webjet plans to buy UK-headquartered JacTravel to create what the companies say is the number two player globally.

The acquisition follows the rapid expansion of market leader Hotelbeds Group, which recently announced deals to buy competitors Tourico Holidays and GTA to help cement its position.

Webjet, which is listed on the Australian Stock Exchange, will pay $265 million (£200 million) for JacTravel. The deal will increase the number of directly contracted beds in Webjet’s WebBeds business to business portfolio from 10,000 to 17,000.

JacTravel itself had recently grown in size through the acquisition of rival TotalStay Group in 2015. JacTravel is currently owned by private equity firm Vitruvian Partners.

John Guscic, managing director of Webjet said: “This acquisition is transformational to WebBeds, creating the #2 B2B player globally and the #2 B2B player in the important European market. WebBeds has always focused on helping our clients succeed and enabling our partners to respond to fast-changing market trends.

“By consolidating with like-minded partners like JacTravel, we believe we will drive even greater synergies that will benefit the wider travel industry. JacTravel is a company we have worked with for many years, and we have the greatest amount of respect for their business.

“We look forward to working with the JacTravel team in the weeks and months ahead as we integrate our businesses and develop the best possible outcomes for all of our partners and clients.”

Terry Williamson, Chief Executive of JacTravel, said: “Our partnership with Vitruvian has been invaluable over the last three years in enabling JacTravel to achieve a step-change in its scale, technology, and geographical reach.  I thank the whole Vitruvian team for their unstinting support, encouragement and contribution.  The combination with Webjet is the next logical step in our global expansion vision which will enable us to offer even greater wider reach to our hotel partners and greater choice and value to our customers.”

As well as a business to business arm, Webjet also serves consumers. Once the deal closes at the end of this month, the business to business component would account for around 44 percent of the combined company’s total transaction value.

Travel

via Skift https://skift.com

August 2, 2017 at 06:06PM

Chamberlain Freedom Park in Brewer, Maine

Chamberlain Freedom Park in Brewer, Maine

http://ift.tt/2viDs5e

On a small hillside in Chamberlain Freedom Park you’ll find a bronze sculpture depicting a slave climbing out of a tunnel. The monument, called North to Freedom, is a memorial to the Underground Railroad, the only official such memorial in Maine.

The tunnel itself had previously been hidden under the historic Holyoke House (which was torn down in 1995), and both the house and tunnel were allegedly part of the secret route used by slaves to escape from the American South into Canada in the 19th century.

The statue is a tribute to the slaves that used the Underground Railroad as well as those who helped and hid them along the way. Though Maine was a free state, it was still illegal for anyone who lived there to aid a runaway slave.

North to Freedom was added to Chamberlain Freedom Park in 2002. The park is named for Civil War hero Brigadier General Joshua Chamberlain, who was born in Brewer, Maine. A statue of the general stands atop this small hill in his hometown, surrounded by commemorative plaques and a monument to the 20th Maine Infantry.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

August 2, 2017 at 06:05PM

Found: A Wealthy Roman Neighborhood in France, Preserved Under Ash

Found: A Wealthy Roman Neighborhood in France, Preserved Under Ash

http://ift.tt/2vj83Qi

article-image

Hundreds of years ago, in the late 1st century A.D., this neighborhood near the Rhône River, in what’s now southwestern France, was a place for wealthy Romans to build sumptuous houses. For 300 years or so, families made their homes here, until one day a fire forced them out of their homes. The neighborhood was abandoned, buried under ash, and forgotten.

Now, as a developer prepares to build new houses here, not far from Lyon, archaeologists have rediscovered this hidden Roman neighborhood. The site is unusually well preserved because of the ash that fell over the buildings. Benjamin Clément, who’s leading the excavation of the site, is calling it a “Little Pompeii.”

The site is large, about 75,000 square feet in area; among the most incredible finds are a residence with an intact mosaic of maenads and satyrs, another with a mosaic of a half-naked muse being kidnapped by Pan, and a public building featuring a statue of Hercules. These were the buildings used by wealth people: the team has found evidence of sumptuous gardens and interior water supply systems. Overall, says Clément, it is the "most exceptional excavation of a Roman site in 40 or 50 years.”

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

August 2, 2017 at 05:51PM

Two Princes Staircase in London, England

Two Princes Staircase in London, England

http://ift.tt/2viUdNU

Two Princes Staircase in the White Tower.

In the White Tower, the old keep at the Tower of London, there is a small staircase tucked away near the entrance. Called the Two Princes Staircase, it’s where the skeletons of two children were found during renovations in 1674. It’s widely believed the skeletons are of the two princes who disappeared at the site in the late 15th century.

Though there has yet to be any scientific evidence to back up the claim, people throughout history have suspected the bones once belonged to Edward V and Richard Duke of York, the sons of King Edward IV. When the king died, his brother, Richard III (who was known as Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester prior to his coronation) had the boys murdered to cement his claim to the throne.

Richard III had originally taken them into his custody in the White Tower after their father’s death in April of 1483. There were no recorded sightings of the young princes after that following summer.

After the bones were discovered buried beneath the stairs in the 17th century, it became widely accepted that they were those of the two princes. Even Shakespeare portrayed Richard III as an evil, scheming, murderous uncle in his play of the same name.

But their true identity may never be known for certain. The two skeletons currently reside in Westminster Abbey, where they were reburied. DNA testing as never been conducted, as the Church of England has continually refused to allow anyone to exhume and examine the remains.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

August 2, 2017 at 05:29PM