Donald Trump Cartoons: Politics and Satire in The New Yorker

Donald Trump Cartoons: Politics and Satire in The New Yorker

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If there’s one thing I trust about Donald Trump, it’s that he’s currently the President. He’s made us laugh until we cried, and then continued to cry in perpetuity. But, as they say, comedy equals tragedy plus time, so one day everything might be hilarious, and also underwater. Our cartoonists have been working hard to transform the daily scandals and horrors into humor, and they’ve been doing a great job. See some of their work above—I’m sure there’s more to come.

See the rest of the story at newyorker.com

Related:
Daily Cartoon: Friday, April 28th
Why Donald Trump Is Skipping the White House Correspondents’ Dinner
1-800-CATS

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April 28, 2017 at 12:48PM

Zalud House in Porterville, California

Zalud House in Porterville, California

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In 1891 the Zalud family, immigrants from Bohemia, built themselves an elaborate European-style mansion with a mansard roof, a style that was unique in the Californian city of Porterville at the time. John Zalud ran a successful saloon with a card room in the back, and his bets in some high-stakes card games paid off. But in 1912 their fortunes began to change.

The family endured an unlikely string of tragedies, and this sad history has been preserved in a small museum at the old house, which has long been rumored to be haunted. 

The misfortune began when one of the Zalud children, Mary Jane, succumbed to a long bout of tuberculosis. Five years later, Anna’s husband William Brooke was shot in a hotel courtyard by a woman who had allegedly rebuffed his advances, causing him to spread defamatory stories about her. At the time of the shooting, he was sitting in a rocking chair, which is today preserved at Zalud House, bullet holes and all. Edward, the son of the house, who ran a bootlegging business during Prohibition, was thrown from his horse in 1922 and died from his injuries. The saddle he was using at the time of his accident also on display at the house.

After this devastating decade, the Zaluds spent most of their time away from the house, visiting occasionally to check on it. The last Zalud to live there was Pearle who moved back to spend the last decade of her life in her childhood home. She died in 1962 and she donated the house and grounds to the city, to be converted into a museum in memory of her parents. 

The rumors of paranormal activity are never too far from a house with so many tragedies, and sure enough, reports of medicinal smells can allegedly be picked up in the house around the anniversary of Mary Jane’s death, rumored to be remnants of her prolonged illness. Haunted or not, the Zalud house is unique as the entire house is furnished with the family’s actual possessions, and walking inside is like taking a step back in time more than 100 years. In a part of California that has long since given way to urban sprawl and innumerable strip malls, the Zalud house offers a glimpse of what life was like in a previous age.

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April 28, 2017 at 12:34PM

Zalud House in Porterville, California

Zalud House in Porterville, California

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In 1891 the Zalud family, immigrants from Bohemia, built themselves an elaborate European-style mansion with a mansard roof, a style that was unique in the Californian city of Porterville at the time. John Zalud ran a successful saloon with a card room in the back, and his bets in some high-stakes card games paid off. But in 1912 their fortunes began to change.

The family endured an unlikely string of tragedies, and this sad history has been preserved in a small museum at the old house, which has long been rumored to be haunted. 

The misfortune began when one of the Zalud children, Mary Jane, succumbed to a long bout of tuberculosis. Five years later, Anna’s husband William Brooke was shot in a hotel courtyard by a woman who had allegedly rebuffed his advances, causing him to spread defamatory stories about her. At the time of the shooting, he was sitting in a rocking chair, which is today preserved at Zalud House, bullet holes and all. Edward, the son of the house, who ran a bootlegging business during Prohibition, was thrown from his horse in 1922 and died from his injuries. The saddle he was using at the time of his accident also on display at the house.

After this devastating decade, the Zaluds spent most of their time away from the house, visiting occasionally to check on it. The last Zalud to live there was Pearle who moved back to spend the last decade of her life in her childhood home. She died in 1962 and she donated the house and grounds to the city, to be converted into a museum in memory of her parents. 

The rumors of paranormal activity are never too far from a house with so many tragedies, and sure enough, reports of medicinal smells can allegedly be picked up in the house around the anniversary of Mary Jane’s death, rumored to be remnants of her prolonged illness. Haunted or not, the Zalud house is unique as the entire house is furnished with the family’s actual possessions, and walking inside is like taking a step back in time more than 100 years. In a part of California that has long since given way to urban sprawl and innumerable strip malls, the Zalud house offers a glimpse of what life was like in a previous age.

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April 28, 2017 at 12:33PM

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s House in Aarhus, Denmark

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s House in Aarhus, Denmark

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The house on Fiskergade 82, where Drakenberg lived.

The grey house looks like the others around it, ordinary and unassuming. But a closer look at the walls of Fiskergade 82 in Aarhus, and you will find a plaque with a grand statement: “In this house, the world’s oldest sailor, Denmark’s oldest mariner and Aarhus’ oldest inhabitant, Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg passed away. Born 18th November 1626, died 9th October 1772. He reached an age of 146 years."

The legend of Drakenberg or "Drak," as he was known, has remained a mystery for decades. Did he actually live until the age of 146? Nobody knows for sure. But Sophus Emil Johnsen, a Danish sailor and chandler, deeply believed that he did, and was so fascinated by Drak he spent many years of his life trying to spread the story of this remarkable man.

He certainly had a lot of material to work with: The tales surrounding Drakenberg are numerous and fantastic. Drak’s career as a sailor in the Danish navy included three stints fighting the Swedes, being captured by pirates, and 15 years as a slave under various masters in the Mediterranean before he escaped and made his way back to Denmark. Once on Danish soil with tales to tell, he became a favorite of the aristocracy who enjoyed his stories and showed him off as a living curiosity. Word of this extraordinary, feisty old man got around and in 1735 he was presented to King Christian VI where he was thanked for his war services under three Danish kings and received an annuity.

In 1760, supposedly at the ripe age of 134, Drak arrived in Aarhus and became a lodger at Fiskergade 82—the house in which he would spend his last years. At the time, most people genuinely believed his tales, and with his huge white beard, he certainly looked the part. Today, these claims are looked at with a more skeptical eye. 

Drakenberg’s body was mummified after his death, and placed for several years on display in a closed—but easily opened—yellow casket in Aarhus Cathedral. It was customary for souvenir-hunting visitors to the cathedral to pluck hairs from his beard. This custom was stopped in 1840 when Queen Caroline Amalie visited the cathedral, saw the body, and demanded it buried under the cathedral floor. This sparked a tradition among local boys, who dared each other to throw rocks through a small opening in the wall yelling "Good Day Drakenberg!"

Inspired by his fellow sailor’s incredible life, Johnsen began to collect Drakenberg paraphernalia, and he claimed to have received permission to make a cast from Drak’s mummified body. Johnsen had made his wealth as a ship chandler, but started spending more and more of his time on his obsession with Drakenberg. He built a house for his business and named it "Drakenberghus." He published the periodical Drakenberg-posten, opened a Drakenberg museum north of Aarhus and introduced the Order of Drakenberg—a trophy in the form of a small brass cannon given to people Johnsen deemed worthy. Past recipients include Winston Churchill and Vera Lynn.

This obsession with Drakenberg would eventually drive him to ruin and madness. Johnsen himself became something of a legend, zealously defending Drak’s legacy in increasingly incoherent letters to the local newspaper, walking his pet goat through town dressed in his sailor’s suit and pretending to be captain of the town’s trams. He died penniless and his last remaining Drakenberg souvenirs were disposed of.

However, one of Johnsen’s contributions that remains is the plaque outside Drakenberg’s last house in Aarhus. It was installed on the November 18, on what would have been, if the stories are to be believed, the colorful sailor’s 300th birthday.

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April 28, 2017 at 12:06PM

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s House in Aarhus, Denmark

Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg’s House in Aarhus, Denmark

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The house on Fiskergade 82, where Drakenberg lived.

The grey house looks like the others around it, ordinary and unassuming. But a closer look at the walls of Fiskergade 82 in Aarhus, and you will find a plaque with a grand statement: “In this house, the world’s oldest sailor, Denmark’s oldest mariner and Aarhus’ oldest inhabitant, Christian Jacobsen Drakenberg passed away. Born 18th November 1626, died 9th October 1772. He reached an age of 146 years."

The legend of Drakenberg or "Drak," as he was known, has remained a mystery for decades. Did he actually live until the age of 146? Nobody knows for sure. But Sophus Emil Johnsen, a Danish sailor and chandler, deeply believed that he did, and was so fascinated by Drak he spent many years of his life trying to spread the story of this remarkable man.

He certainly had a lot of material to work with: The tales surrounding Drakenberg are numerous and fantastic. Drak’s long career as a sailor in the Danish navy included three stints fighting the Swedes, being captured by pirates, and 15 years as a slave under various masters in the Mediterranean before he escaped and made his way back to Denmark. Once on Danish soil with tales to tell, he became a favorite of the aristocracy who enjoyed his stories and showed him off as a living curiosity. Word of this extraordinary, feisty old man got around and in 1735 he was presented to King Christian VI where he was thanked for his war services under three Danish kings and received an annuity.

In 1760, supposedly at the ripe age of 134, Drak arrived in Aarhus and became a lodger at Fiskergade 82—the house in which he would spend his last years. At the time, most people genuinely believed his tales, and with his huge white beard, he certainly looked the part. Today, these claims are looked at with a more skeptical eye. 

Drakenberg’s body was mummified after his death, and placed for several years on display in a closed—but easily opened—yellow casket in Aarhus Cathedral. It was customary for souvenir-hunting visitors to the cathedral to pluck hairs from his beard. This custom was stopped in 1840 when Queen Caroline Amalie visited the cathedral, saw the body, and demanded it buried under the cathedral floor. This sparked a tradition among local boys, who dared each other to throw rocks through a small opening in the wall yelling "Good Day Drakenberg!"

Inspired by his fellow sailor’s incredible life, Johnsen began to collect Drakenberg paraphernalia, and he claimed to have received permission to make a cast from Drak’s mummified body. Johnsen had made his wealth as a ship chandler, but started spending more and more of his time on his obsession with Drakenberg. He built a house for his business and named it "Drakenberghus." He published the periodical Drakenberg-posten, opened a Drakenberg museum north of Aarhus and introduced the Order of Drakenberg—a trophy in the form of a small brass cannon given to people Johnsen deemed worthy. Past recipients include Winston Churchill and Vera Lynn.

This obsession with Drakenberg would eventually drive him to ruin and madness. Johnsen himself became something of a legend, zealously defending Drak’s legacy in increasingly incoherent letters to the local newspaper, walking his pet goat through town dressed in his sailor’s suit and pretending to be captain of the town’s trams. He died penniless and his last remaining Drakenberg souvenirs were disposed of.

However, one of Johnsen’s contributions that remains is the plaque outside Drakenberg’s last house in Aarhus. It was installed on the November 18, on what would have been, if the stories are to be believed, the colorful sailor’s 300th birthday.

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April 28, 2017 at 12:05PM

How Far Can You Fly With Amex Platinum’s 60k Sign-up Bonus?

How Far Can You Fly With Amex Platinum’s 60k Sign-up Bonus?

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With the sign-up bonus on The Platinum Card from American Express increasing to 60,000 points over the last month, many are wondering how to put these points to good use. There are currently hundreds of ways to redeem 60,000 Membership Rewards points, thanks to Amex’ extensive transfer partner list. After meeting the $5,000 spending requirement, here are some ways you can get great value out of your 60,000 point haul:

The Platinum Card® from American Express

 

1 – Singapore Business Class

Following the March 2017 Singapore Krisflyer devaluation, the number of miles required for premium cabin awards increased substantially. Part of this was due to increases in redemption rates and part of it was the discontinuation of the 15% online booking rebate.

That said, it’s still possible to book Singapore’s premium cabin awards with the 60,000 point sign-up bonus from the Amex Platinum cards. One example is the New York – Frankfurt route, which costs 65,000 miles each way in business class. Now that’s not as great as the previous 48,875 miles but it’s still at least possible to cover one-way fare with a single credit card sign-up bonus.

2 – Transfer to Avios for a JAL flight to Japan

If you’re on the West Coast, you’re probably aware of a British Airways award chart sweet spot: 25,000 miles each way for a flight to Tokyo on Japan Airlines. With the 60,000 point sign-up bonus from the Amex Platinum card, you could book one roundtrip ticket and have 15,000 points left to spare. Or you could splurge on a business class ticket, setting you back 50,000 miles each way.

3 – Transfer to Avios for 12,500 West Coast – Hawaii Flights

There are lots of great ways to redeem Avios and flights between the West Coast and Hawaii is one definite sweet spot. Considering legacy carriers normally charge 22,500 miles each way for these awards, redeeming just 12,500 Avios each way is a bargain. With the 60,000 point sign-up bonus from the Amex Platinum card, you can cover roundtrip airfare for two to Hawaii and have 15,000 Membership Rewards points left to play with.

4 – Redeem a Star Alliance Award between the West Coast and Europe

American Express’ partnership with Aeroplan makes it possible to use the sign-up bonus from the Amex Platinum card for travel to Europe on Star Alliance carriers. For just 60,000 miles and $112 you can fly roundtrip between San Francisco and Frankfurt on United. If you prefer a premium cabin, you could instead redeem 55,000 miles and around $500 for a one-way business class ticket on the same route. All this for just one sign-up bonus. Not bad!

5 – Book travel through Membership Rewards

Redeeming points directly through Membership Rewards Travel can work out well if you play it right. You can redeem 65,000 Membership Rewards points for $650 worth of travel. If you’re someone who likes staying at budget hotels and flying budget airlines, that travel cash can go a long way and actually save you a ton of more valuable points through your favorite hotel or airline program.

These are some of the ways you can get hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars worth of value out of the 60,000 point sign-up bonus from the Amex Platinum card. If you’ve recently picked up this card, I’d love to know: How are you putting your sign-up bonus to use?

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April 28, 2017 at 12:01PM

Scott SuperGuide 95 Review – Up/Down/All-Around Ski

Scott SuperGuide 95 Review – Up/Down/All-Around Ski

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Scott 1.jpg Just getting distracted (in the best way) before taking Scott SuperGuide 95 out for a rip on an April deep day in the San Juans.

Just getting distracted (in the best way) before taking Scott SuperGuide 95 out for a rip on an April deep day in the San Juans.

You know those long tours that are more for the adventure itself and less about the great skiing conditions? You know the type: they usually involve good friends, a flask of something yummy, lots of beautiful scenic alpine miles, and generally some really junky “snow.” Well sometimes those walks end up having surprise killer tree skiing and include north-facing untouched powder fields! When those days happen, you want skis like the Scott SuperGuide “SG” 95.

One of those days

One of those days.

First and foremost, this winter, the SuperGuide proved to be a versatile and reliable backcountry ski. Again, this is the kind of ski that is nice to have around on the days that you’re going to hit all sorts of variations in snow conditions. I’ve tested it in deep powder, on the most heinous breakable crust my knees have ever experienced, spring corn, and frozen chunder while night skiing.

Scott SuperGuide 95, 168cm length

Scott SuperGuide 95, 168cm length

I wouldn’t say that this ski performed at the highest in its class in any of these individual types of snow, however, I will say that it worked through ALL of the variations in snow quite well. This leads me to say that it is a good all-around ski that has the ability to be playful and maneuverable. If you were to have one ski in your AT quiver, the SuperGuide could be the perfect fit.

On the uphill SuperGuide 95 feels light but sturdy. The Paulownia wood core gives the ski a nice light float to it, while the carbon and Aramid wrap keeps it strong and resilient. I felt confident while billygoating around on exposed rock sections and during narrow creek crossings. This ski is a pleasure to uphill on.

The Scott SuperGuide 95 is available in three lengths: 168, 178, 184. I tested the shortest of the bunch, which comes in at a weight of about 1306 grams on the WildSnow scale. Scott states that the 184s weight about 1530 grams. This ski sits in the comfy zone of compromise between a nice downhill ride and skin track efficiency.

tips and tails feature deeper cut sidewalls

The tips and tails feature deeper cut sidewalls for smaller radius turns while the sections closer to center have next to vertical side walls for better edging abilities. Early rise in the tips allows for some added buoyancy.

This ski first arrived for the winter 2015/16 season and pretty much remains unchanged except for updated graphic on the 2016/17 ski.

Cleaver holes in the tips and tails allow for Scott skins to be clipped closer to the center of the ski reducing unnecessary skin weight.

Cleaver holes in the tips and tails allow for Scott skins to be clipped closer to the center of the ski reducing unnecessary skin weight.

Overall, if a one-quiver wonder is your game or you just want a reliable ski that will happily take you up and down all the different versions of “snow” we find out there, the Scott SuperGuide 95 might be the perfect all-in-one for you!

Manufacturer specs:
Available lengths cm: 168, 178, 184
Tip mm: 126, 128, 130
Waist mm: 94, 95, 96
Tail mm: 114, 116, 118
Radius: 19m, 21m, 22m
Construction: Sandwich Sidewall Construction, Carbon/Aramid Elliptic
Weight gm/ski: 1370, 1450, 1530

Shop for Scott skis here.

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April 28, 2017 at 11:21AM

Daily Cartoon: Friday, April 28th

Daily Cartoon: Friday, April 28th

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April 28, 2017 at 11:13AM

Fort Ord in Monterey, California

Fort Ord in Monterey, California

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Fort Ord was once the jewel of the United States Army. Founded in 1917 as a target range for field artillery, it was situated on 45 square miles of dunes and forest along the coast of Monterey Bay. It was considered fortunate to stationed at Fort Ord, as the surroundings were picturesque and the weather beautiful.

At its height, Fort Ord was home to upwards of 50,000 troops, serving as the staging area for soldiers of the Korean and Vietnam Wars. This installation had an action-packed life for nearly 80 years. And then President George H. W. Bush signed into legislation the Base Realignment and Closure act in 1988.

With the new law, the EPA ran an assessment of the army base’s environmental impact, and the results were not promising. Within its 45 acres were underground storage tanks leaking petroleum into the groundwater, numerous landfills and dump sites, and innumerable unexploded mines. The Fort was promptly closed in 1994—the largest of the military’s bases to be shut down—and placed on the National Priorities List as a Superfund site, one of the most toxic places in America.

And so begun a coordinated effort between the government, the military, and the local community to clean up and rejuvenate the aging, polluted property. A major portion of the base became the Fort Ord National Monument, with over 80 miles of public trails snaking through the forests. Another part was given to the California State University of Monterey Bay. And still another section was set aside for commercial and residential development by the surrounding towns.

But approximately 20 percent of the original military structures remain, with lead paint on their walls and weeds peeking through the cracked floorboards. They will eventually either be stripped of their toxic elements and reused in new construction or completely disposed of. Until then, these buildings from Fort Ord’s glory days can still be seen, nature slowly creeping through the streets that once heard the rhythmic steps of servicemen long gone.

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April 28, 2017 at 11:02AM

Fort Ord in Monterey, California

Fort Ord in Monterey, California

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Fort Ord was once the jewel of the United States Army. Founded in 1917 as a target range for field artillery, it was situated on 45 square miles of dunes and forest along the coast of Monterey Bay. It was considered fortunate to stationed at Fort Ord, as the surroundings were picturesque and the weather beautiful.

At its height, Fort Ord was home to upwards of 50,000 troops, serving as the staging area for soldiers of the Korean and Vietnam Wars. This installation had an action-packed life for nearly 80 years. And then President George H. W. Bush signed into legislation the Base Realignment and Closure act in 1988.

With the new law, the EPA ran an assessment of the army base’s environmental impact, and the results were not promising. Within its 45 acres were underground storage tanks leaking petroleum into the groundwater, numerous landfills and dump sites, and innumerable unexploded mines. The Fort was promptly closed in 1994—the largest of the military’s bases to be shut down—and placed on the National Priorities List as a Superfund site, one of the most toxic places in America.

And so begun a coordinated effort between the government, the military, and the local community to clean up and rejuvenate the aging, polluted property. A major portion of the base became the Fort Ord National Monument, with over 80 miles of public trails snaking through the forests. Another part was given to the California State University of Monterey Bay. And still another section was set aside for commercial and residential development by the surrounding towns.

But approximately 20 percent of the original military structures remain, with lead paint on their walls and weeds peeking through the cracked floorboards. They will eventually either be stripped of their toxic elements and reused in new construction or completely disposed of. Until then, these buildings from Fort Ord’s glory days can still be seen, nature slowly creeping through the streets that once heard the rhythmic steps of servicemen long gone.

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April 28, 2017 at 11:01AM