Dead Girls, Female Murderers, and Megan Abbott’s Novel “Give Me Your Hand”

Dead Girls, Female Murderers, and Megan Abbott’s Novel “Give Me Your Hand”

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In part thanks to “Dead Girls,” a provocative essay collection by Alice Bolin, but also thanks to the endless stream of entertainment focussed on dead girls, from “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” to “Serial” to “The Night Of,” we find ourselves in the midst of a conversation about the Dead Girl. (She’s not just any dead girl. Usually, she is white, straight, and cisgender; young and beautiful; not poor.) This problematic and tantalizing figure has inspired two poles of reaction, outlined in an essay in the Paris Review Daily, by Emma Copley Eisenberg. On one side are writers like Bolin, who argue that murdered women tend to emerge as blank canvases for the psychologies of the men around them. Victims become passive sites of violence, haunting absences, brutalized and sexualized abstractions. In their voicelessness, their post-mortem reduction to their bodies, they serve as unsettling reminders of what certain ideals of femininity look like when carried to the extreme. On the other side of the argument are those who believe that Dead Girl stories might be necessary—that they shed light on deeply entrenched problems of misogyny and sexism.

The novelist Megan Abbott is among the genre’s conflicted champions. In an essay for the Los Angeles Times, she ascribes some of the power of Dead Girl narratives, and of crime tales in general, to “that intense identification between reader and victim.” Dead Girl stories, she suggests, are far from pulpy escapism; they have become “the place women can go to read about the dark, messy stuff of their lives that they’re not supposed to talk about—domestic abuse, serial predation, sexual assault, troubled family lives, conflicted feelings about motherhood, the weight of trauma, partner violence, and the myriad ways the justice system can fail, and silence, women.”

In her fiction, though, Abbott is often more interested in female murderers. Her newest book, “Give Me Your Hand,” traces the relationship between two talented chemists, Kit and Diane, who were close as teen-agers but stopped speaking after Diane entrusted Kit with a secret, a “vile, howling thing.” The women are reunited, a decade later, in the lab of the exacting, glamorous Dr. Lena Severin, a pioneer of research into premenstrual dysphoric disorder (P.M.D.D.), in which the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome are amplified to debilitating levels. The condition comes to symbolize a “dark continent” of femininity, a territory that Kit and Diane compete to survey.

“Give Me Your Hand” is steeped in the feminine gothic. Kit has a “memory of an ancient nightmare, Diane under my bed, shaking it by the springs.” The book sends taproots into the “dark, messy stuff” that Abbott links to womanhood—but she is not prompting us, as in a Dead Girl story, to identify with the murder victim. This novel, instead, explores what characters who have been beaten down and confined by sexism might be capable of. Abbott tempts us to read her tale as a study in what happens when female revenge overflows its bounds, when female rage rises up like a ghost out of the earth. In a flashback, Kit sees Diane’s pale face and asks, “Did someone do something to you? . . . . Did someone hurt you?” But Diane corrects her: “I’m talking about something I did.”

The novel inverts tropes of female victimhood with campy gusto. (In high school, Kit rejects Ophelia, the drowned maiden with flowers in her hair, as a role model. Too inert, she decides. Hamlet is a better fit.) A toxin slipped into prepared food, a contamination not only of the meal but of the romance of domestic care, serves as a murder weapon. So does glass cracked under pressure, something delicate and shining made lethal by intense stress. This dynamic is at play within Diane herself, who embodies feminine fragility and power at once. “It felt like you could hurt her just by looking at her,” Kit thinks, “or you could never hurt her at all.” As teen-agers, Kit and Diane ran cross-country; like the cheerleaders and gymnasts in previous Abbott mysteries, and like the workaholic scientists that they will become, they endured pain and deprivation in order to achieve. Just as success at élite levels is impossible without sacrifice, Abbott slyly hints, the sweetness, the impossible innocence, of femininity entails a dark seam.

In an essay for Slate about revisiting Raymond Chandler in the age of #MeToo, Abbott explains that the archetype of the female slayer flourished in “an era when many white American men felt embattled. Their livelihoods had been taken away—first by the Depression, then by the war, and then by the women who replaced them while they were off fighting.” The stories that resulted, “tales of white, straight men . . . who feel deeply threatened by women, so threatened that they render them all-powerful,” bore the legacy of male anxiety. The femme fatale, like the Dead Girl, traditionally functioned as a cipher, a scrim for misogynist fantasies. Abbott’s fiction hungers for more complex versions of these old types. As Ruth Franklin observes, in a profile of the author in New York, “Give Me Your Hand” “plays with cultural constructions of female ‘blood rage,’ often in a self-consciously ironic way.” Recalling a conversation with Dr. Severin about P.M.D.D., Kit muses, “Don’t we all feel we have something banked down deep inside just waiting for its moment, the slow gathering of hot blood?” (Abbott loves the word “something,” and can work sinister wonders with its contradictory suggestions of evasiveness and presence. Kit reflects, too, on “the fear all men have that there’s something inside us that shifts, and turns.”) Even as “Give Me Your Hand” invokes the old trope of female hormonal madness, it resists it as the ultimate explanation for Diane’s behavior—when (spoiler) she submits herself to a hysterectomy, her murderous impulses remain.

At times, though, Abbott mistakes reproducing noir myths of femininity for subverting them. Whether the yonic horror of Diane’s actions finally derives from biology or culture, the novel’s pervasive visual grammar, its exhalations of gendered dread, hint at a connection between her and the other female characters, who in turn feel subtly driven by their experience as women. (Grazing her hand over a pile of P.M.D.D. literature, Kit remembers Diane’s words: “It’s you . . . It’s both of us.”) The murderesses in “Give Me Your Hand” remain victims, cracking under the strain of performing, charming, summoning up, and forcing down. (“Diane was so quiet, so private,” Kit says. “I couldn’t imagine [her] doing anything that wasn’t careful and correct.”) The same energies that slay some women, the novel seems to say, can twist other women into slayers. Kit and Diane do not counteract the Dead Girl so much as meet her gaze from the other side of the mirror.

Take, by contrast, another recent pop-culture murderess, Villanelle, of the BBC’s “Killing Eve,” a series that attempts, like Abbott, to refract the thriller through a feminist lens. Villanelle is a female killer who shares almost nothing in common with the Dead Girl. The unquestioned star of her own story, she luxuriates in some facets of her femininity, while shrugging off the parts that don’t suit. She relishes clothes, has opinions about hair, flings her body around her enviably dilapidated French apartment, wolfs down bruschetta, crams her refrigerator with champagne. She commits murder via perfume, gun, knife, or whatever else she feels like. If someone, like an overconfident fellow-assassin or her affected new handler, bothers her, she shoots him. Her kills are expressions of style, whimsy, and uncomplicated power.

It is unfair to expect anything similar from the women in “Give Me Your Hand.” Villanelle springs from fantasy. She wields limitless wits and limitless wealth; she moves through the world seemingly unencumbered by constraints of any kind. While Abbott’s fiction (like noir historically) probes real societal anxieties—of family, work, illness—“Killing Eve” conjures a female future that has yet to dawn. But in imagining a character built so completely from male desires, and at the same time so unconcerned with them, “Killing Eve” constructs a bracing new model for feminist revenge. Patriarchy, though it abets Villanelle (no one thinks the assassin could be female), doesn’t define her. Her ardor is reserved for life, and for Eve, the detective whom she circles as fervently as Eve circles her, and as avidly as generations of detectives have circled Dead Girls and their dangerous, bewitching counterparts. This is its own sort of feminist breakthrough: she is Villanelle first, a woman second.

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July 18, 2018 at 07:21PM

It’s Official: Boeing Will Get $3.9 Billion to Build New Air Force One

It’s Official: Boeing Will Get $3.9 Billion to Build New Air Force One

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The White House confirmed Wednesday that plane builder Boeing will be getting $3.9 billion to build two new Air Force One aircraft for use by future US presidents.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders confirmed on Wednesday that the contract had been signed. “Yesterday, the United States Air Force awarded a firm fixed price contract to The Boeing Company to design, modify, test, certify and deliver two Presidential, mission-ready aircraft by 2024,” Sanders said in a statement.

The two new Boeing 747-8 aircraft will replace the current two Air Force One planes, which were ordered by Ronald Reagan and are now about 30 years old. The replacement effort for the new presidential planes began in 2011.

In December 2016, however, then President-Elect Donald Trump called the order into question, when he tweeted the costs for the two aircraft were too high.

The price for the new Air Force One order was then negotiated down to the current $3.9 billion. In her statement, Sanders says the order will save “the taxpayers over $1.4 billion from the initially proposed $5.3 billion-plus contract.”

Trump has also said he wants to change more than just the price of the planes. He says the new jets will have a completely redesigned livery than the current two-tone shades of light blue. Trump wants a red, white and blue color scheme, which he says is “more American.”

“It’s going to be the top of the line, the top in the world,” Trump told CBS. “And it’s going be red, white and blue, which I think is appropriate.”

The current color scheme has been in place since the first modern Air Force One aircraft were ordered in the 1960s by the Kennedy Administration, and it was designed in part by both President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy.

Featured image by Raymond Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images.

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July 18, 2018 at 07:01PM

Airbus Condemns UK’s Crumbling Brexit Plan

Airbus Condemns UK’s Crumbling Brexit Plan

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Airbus SE Chief Executive Officer Tom Enders bashed U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s “unraveling” Brexit plan, following on similar criticism leveled by Rolls Royce.

Airbus is activating contingency plans and will stockpile parts in preparation for border delays after the U.K. exits the European Union next year, Enders said Wednesday at the Farnborough air show southwest of London. The planemaker, based in Toulouse, France, operates a so-called just-in-time production system and makes wings for its planes at a plant in Broughton, Wales. Enders said the company needs to create an inventory buffer to insure against any shortages.

May has been forced to retreat on key elements of her blueprint for managing trade with Europe after the split, including plans for a relatively seamless movement of parts across the English Channel. Warren East, CEO of U.K.-based Rolls, on Tuesday made his strongest comments yet about the plan’s dilution, saying the enginemaker would decide by year-end whether it too needed to build up a supply of parts.

Airbus has been one of the most outspoken business voices warning about the threat and cost of new border controls after Brexit. While the release of May’s white paper earlier this month had given companies some optimism, that feeling is now gone.

“I thought the white paper was going in the right direction, the changes were going in the right direction,” Enders told reporters. “Now we see that they’re unraveling again, so all the more reason for us to take now serious decisions.”

Airbus employees travel between 80,000 and 90,000 times between the European Union and the U.K. each year, the CEO said, adding that the issue of movement is “something that’s worrying us.”

©2018 Bloomberg L.P.

This article was written by Benjamin Katz from Bloomberg and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Photo Credit: Airbus CEO Tom Enders has been a vocal critic of Theresa May’s Brexit plan. Bloomberg

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July 18, 2018 at 06:38PM

EU’s $5 Billion Fine Against Google Brings Travel Back Into the Spotlight

EU’s $5 Billion Fine Against Google Brings Travel Back Into the Spotlight

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Ever since the European Commission slapped Google with a $2.7 billion (€2.42 billion) fine a year ago for breaching antitrust rules with its shopping product, there have been rumors that its travel tools might be next in the firing line.

So far, however, nothing has materlalized and instead the commission, which serves as the European Union’s executive arm, came down hard Wednesday on Google’s Android operating system, fining the company $5 billion (€4.34 billion) for imposing “illegal restrictions on Android device manufacturers and mobile network operators to cement its dominant position in general Internet search.”

It’s another meaty punishment — although one that Google again plans to appeal — and shows just how happy Commissioner Margrethe Vestager is to go up against the technology giant. Might she now want to take a look at Google’s travel offering?

Last year, The Times of London reported that the commission was looking at Google’s flight and hotels services, although there appears to be no formal proceedings. Skift contacted the Commission about any further investigations but has yet to hear back.

But for some in the travel industry, today’s decision should act as a springboard for further probes into Google’s conduct.

“The commission’s antitrust decision in the Google Android case is welcome, as it addresses yet another area of abuse by Google which hampers market entry, innovation and competition,” said Christoph Klenner, secretary general of the European Technology and Travel Services Association, a lobbying group for online travel companies.

“However, the Commission now needs to swiftly and resolutely address Google’s continued abuse of dominance notably in flight and accommodation search, which costs travel consumers in excess of $12 billion every year.”

While Google did appeal last year’s decision relating to its online shopping search product, it also introduced its own remedy that it hoped would assuage the commission’s issues.

The problem for Google is that some of its biggest critics have said its solution isn’t working.

Foundem founders Adam and Shivaun Raff, who have fought a battle against technology giant over the last couple of years, wrote to Vestager earlier this year, saying that despite Google agreeing to some remedy proposals, “the harm to competition, consumers and innovation caused by the infringement” continued.

In a more recent submission to the commission, the Raffs go into more details about the flaws in Google’s argument and say it could actually do more harm then good and impact other sectors such as “as travel search, local search, jobs search, property search, and so on.”

“In each case, sophisticated vertical search functionality will be replaced wholesale by a crude and positively harmful collection of pay-for-placement ads,” they said.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission investigated Google several years ago and declined to take any action despite internal recommendations to do so.

Photo Credit: Google has been levied with another multibillion dollar fine by the EU, this time related to its Android business. Pictured is the Google Trips feature, which was not part of the ruling. Google

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July 18, 2018 at 06:26PM

Uber and Lyft Have a New Competitor, BMW

Uber and Lyft Have a New Competitor, BMW

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Uber and Lyft have a new competitor, and it’s not just another Silicon Valley based startup. ReachNow, BMW’s car-sharing service is launching a ride-hailing service of its own.

For those unfamiliar with ReachNow, it offers short-term rentals of BMW and Mini Cooper vehicles, à la Zip Car or Car2go (which plans to merge with ReachNow). Now when users open up the ReachNow app, there’s a “Ride” option where you can hail a car to pick you up and take you wherever you need. Seattle is the only city where you’ll see this feature, but it’s possible it will expand to the other cities where ReachNow operates, Portland and Brooklyn. ReachNow, the car rental vertical of BMW, is launching a ride-hailing service in Seattle that will compete with Uber and Lyft.

ReachNow will differentiate itself by offering a handful of perks like the ability to pre-request the temperature inside your ride, the music selection (or lack thereof), use of phone chargers and free Voss water and candy.

Unfortunately there’s no such thing as a free lunch — rides are pricier than competitors Uber and Lyft but on par with higher-end options like Uber Black or Lyft Lux. Trips will costs $2.40 a mile plus 40 cents per minute, in addition to a base charge. However, ReachNow won’t participate in surge-pricing.

This differs from Uber and Lyft’s strategy of offering preset prices based on the estimated time, distance and demand of a route (and sometimes what it thinks you’re willing to pay).

ReachNow drivers are using cars owned by the company, not their own personal vehicles so they’ll save on maintenance, gas and insurance costs. They’re also paid hourly instead of being compensated per ride. They’ll take home $14.25 an hour and full benefits are offered to eligible drivers — they’ll even receive a five percent bonus if their average rating stays above 4.8 stars.

H/T: The Seattle Times

Featured image courtesy of ReachNow. 

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July 18, 2018 at 06:10PM

United Reports Record On-Time Percentage, Jump in Fuel Costs, Huge Drop in Taxes

United Reports Record On-Time Percentage, Jump in Fuel Costs, Huge Drop in Taxes

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United Airlines reported its second quarter results late Tuesday, with profit dropping to $684 million, or 17% from the same period of last year.  Yet shares were up 9% at midday on Wall Street on the earnings news, which was better than the expectations of analysts, but there are some interesting details in its earnings release:

Record On-Time Percentage

Without listing its on-time percentage anywhere in the 5,234-word report, United boasted:

  • Ranked first among largest competitors in on-time departures in the quarter.
  • Completed the best second-quarter on-time departure performance in United’s history.

The most recent Bureau of Transportation Statistics release includes only on-time data through April 2018. In April, United reported a 83.9% on-time percentage — which is 5th place behind Hawaiian (87.7%), Delta (86.4%), regional airline Mesa (85.1%) and American Airlines (83.9%). So, it’ll be interesting to see if United’s claim to be the best holds up when the official May and June BTS statistics are released.

Yuuuge Tax Savings

In the depths of the financial statements, United disclosed that its effective tax rate fell from 35.5% in the first half of 2017 to 20.2% in the first half of 2018. That 43% reduction in its tax rate is credited to “the reduced federal corporate income tax rate as a result of the enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the ‘Tax Act’) in December 2017.”

United’s preliminary income tax expense for the first half of 2018 is $210 million. Applying the 35.5% tax rate to the pretax income of $1.041 billion would be a tax expense of $370 million. That means, assuming the same tax rate as the first half of 2017, United has saved $160 million due to the new tax law so far in 2018.

Note that United didn’t follow Southwest and American Airlines in giving bonuses to its workers after the new tax law was enacted. However, it did try to sneakily slash employee bonuses by around $36 million before ultimately retreating on that effort.

Soaring Fuel Costs

You’re not the only one feeling the pinch at the pump. Despite United’s record on-time performance and drastic drop in taxes, its net income dropped nearly 17% year-over-year. And that’s mostly because of soaring fuel costs. United’s fuel costs jumped 43% in the same period, increasing costs by a whopping $721 million for the three-month period.

United’s cost for airline fuel jumped from $1.62 per gallon on average from Q2 2017 up to $2.24 per gallon in Q2 2018 as it pumped 885 million gallons of jet fuel. The airline did get ever-so-slightly more efficient, increasing capacity by 4.3% while increasing fuel consumption by only 2.1%.

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July 18, 2018 at 05:57PM

Grenade-Shaped Marijuana Grinder Caused an Airport Evacuation in Argentina

Grenade-Shaped Marijuana Grinder Caused an Airport Evacuation in Argentina

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July 18, 2018 at 05:45PM

Delta Air Lines Hiring 8,000 Pilots Over the Next 10 Years

Delta Air Lines Hiring 8,000 Pilots Over the Next 10 Years

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Delta Air Lines is hiring pilots. A lot of pilots.

The second-largest US airline is recruiting to fill a predicted 8,000 open positions in its cockpits over the next decade, and the carrier is even encouraging its ticket agents, baggage handlers and flight attendants to consider switching to a pilot role. If they choose to pursue the position, they can even take an unpaid leave of absence for flight school with a pilot job waiting for them at the end of it.

Delta is just one of the airlines beginning to feel the pilot shortage, which is starting to take hold across the world. Boeing predicts a need for 637,000 new pilots across the globe by 2036, with at least 18% of those needed in North America. A major factor driving the shortage is the thousands of commercial pilots hitting the mandatory retirement age of 65 in coming years, as well as the prohibitively expensive cost of flight school that is creating a bottleneck of new pilots.

And Delta is encouraging its internal applicants to attend ATP Flight School, among others, which costs about $80,000 for a student with no flight experience. Along with existing non-pilot employees, the airline is targeting college students to fill its opening jobs in coming years. Delta announced that it’s partnering with eight universities with accredited aviation programs, and it will begin accepting applications from the schools in August.

Among the schools in the program are Auburn University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and the University of North Dakota. Delta says that newly minted pilots can be flying the airline’s major routes in about three-and-a-half years — an accelerated timeline — after clocking flight experience with either military aircraft, flying for Delta Connection carriers, job-share flying Delta Private Jets or instructing with the airline’s partner schools. Passenger airline pilots need at least 1,500 hours of flight experience.

But pilots won’t start to earn big bucks until they make it to the major airline routes. Newbie pilots, who must start at the bottom of the food chain on regional flights, make a starting salary of about $50,000 to $60,000, with the opportunity to earn a bonus of tens of thousands on top of that. Captains at a major airline make about $100,000.

The median salary for Delta’s pilots as of May was $78,740, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

If you’re in the market for a new job or a career change, check out Delta’s new pilot recruiting program, The Delta Propel Pilot Career Path Program.

H/T: CNBC

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July 18, 2018 at 05:45PM

Marriott Will Ditch All Plastic Straws by 2019

Marriott Will Ditch All Plastic Straws by 2019

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July 18, 2018 at 05:45PM

Philippine Airlines Steps Up Quest for Chinese Tourists

Philippine Airlines Steps Up Quest for Chinese Tourists

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The sandy shores of the Philippines will soon be within easier reach of Chinese tourists looking for a summer vacation spot.

Philippine Airlines Inc. plans to begin flights this year to secondary cities in China, which may include Nanning, Haikou, Hangzhou and Chengdu, where tourists rent planes to go to the island resorts of Boracay, Palawan and Cebu, President Jaime Bautista said in an interview Tuesday. The airline, owned by billionaire Lucio Tan, also intends to boost the frequency of its Manila-Shanghai route.

Bautista said the company’s purchase of Airbus A321neos has enabled the expanded plan for China, as smaller and more efficient planes allow the airline to cover more destinations without sacrificing capacity. Philippine Airlines started direct flights from Manila to Brisbane, Australia, and will begin a route to Sapporo, Japan, following the delivery of the first two of six Airbus A321neos this year.

Chinese tourists who now want to visit the islands must fly from a major city like Beijing or Shanghai to Clark or Manila, and then take another plane to the resorts. Philippine Airlines will increase the frequency of its Manila-Shanghai flights to 10 times a week from daily starting July 27.

China is the fastest-growing travel market for the Philippines. The national carrier flew about 700,000 passengers from the mainland in 2017, and expects an increase of about 50 percent this year, Sales Vice President Ryan Uy said in an email.

©2018 Bloomberg L.P.

This article was written by Claire Jiao from Bloomberg and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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July 18, 2018 at 05:34PM