The Göttingen Collection of Mathematical Models in Göttingen, Germany

The Göttingen Collection of Mathematical Models in Göttingen, Germany

http://ift.tt/2uaW1bk

The University of Göttingen has a long history of academic excellence, but in the early 20th century, its mathematics departments was one of the main attractions.

The department’s stars were Felix Klein and David Hilbert, and one of Klein’s projects was to develop and preserve the school’s incredible collection of mathematical models. Started in 1780 with a set of cardboard polyhedrons, today the collection has hundreds of models dated from the 18th to the 21st century.

These models represent everything from algebraic curves to topology to probability theory. The collection also includes mathematical instruments—calculating devices, drawing devices, planimeters, and more.

The collection was designed to combine "technical mathematical knowledge with aesthetically-pleasing geometrical representations," as mathematician and historian David E. Rowe writes—although math lovers might enjoy the ideas represented here, the collection itself is remarkably accessible to even the least math-minded person. These are beautiful objects, regardless of what they represent.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

July 10, 2017 at 07:01PM

The Best Demon Illustrations of All Time

The Best Demon Illustrations of All Time

http://ift.tt/2tAD5kI

Demon ruler Bael, from the <em>Dictionnaire Infernal</em>.Demon ruler Bael, from the Dictionnaire Infernal. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain

The demons of the underworld that tempt us into sin are (theoretically, anyway) endless in number. Yet this didn’t stop the early 19th century occultist writer Jacques Collin de Plancy from trying to catalog them anyway.

Like many demonologists before him, de Plancy set out to create an accounting of demonic events and forces in his book, Dictionnaire Infernal. What sets de Plancy’s work apart is his frighteningly surreal illustrations—the devils that make up his occult bestiary are some of the most evocative in the history of demonic literature.

Amduscias, demon of thunder and the music.Amduscias, demon of thunder and the music. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain

De Plancy published dozens of titles in his lifetime, but he never surpassed the success (or infamy) of the Dictionnaire Infernal, which first appeared in 1818 and was followed by several updated editions. The full subhead for the 1926 edition describes the book as a “universal library on the beings, characters, books, deeds, and causes which pertain to the manifestations and magic of trafficking with Hell; divinations, occult sciences, grimoires, marvels, errors, prejudices, traditions, folktales, the various superstitions, and generally all manner of marvelous, surprising, mysterious, and supernatural beliefs.”

Many of the demonic descriptions in the Dictionnaire Infernal have their roots in earlier demonological texts, such as the 16th century Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, or the 17th century Lesser Key of Solomon. Both of those titles contained hierarchical descriptions of Hell’s many denizens, versions of which de Plancy included in his text. Among the spirits presented in de Plancy’s book are well-known evils such as Lucifer and greedy Mammon, but also more obscure devils such as the lower demon Ukobach, who tends to fireworks and oils, and the bellows-bearing fallen angel Xaphan.

Biblical demon, Asmodeus.Biblical demon, Asmodeus. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain

When de Plancy first published his guide to the world of demons in 1818, he had a reputation as an opponent of superstition and religion. However, in 1841, de Plancy had a change of heart, and converted into a devout Catholic. By the sixth edition of the Dictionnaire Infernal, published in 1863, whether influenced by his conversion or simply thanks to extra resources, de Plancy included illustrations. And it’s a good thing he did, as the bizarre images that accompanied the text are some of the most indelible depictions of demons ever created.

The 1863 edition of the book featured hundreds of spot illustrations, over 60 of which were of specific demons. They were designed by the French painter Louis Le Breton, and then engraved as woodcuts by M. Jarrault, both of whom signed many of the illustrations. Their odd depictions of stilt-legged owl men, insect-legged frog-cat kings, and spiral-horned jesters transformed the Dictionnaire Infernal from an occult oddity that could easily have been forgotten to a frightening bestiary that is still referenced and shared today.

The demon Andras, with the head of an owl and the body of an angel.The demon Andras, with the head of an owl and the body of an angel. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain

Since 1863, the illustrations from de Plancy’s book have also been used to accompany esoteric titles such as new printings of the Lesser Key of Solomon, plus any number of books on magic and demonology (thanks, Public Domain!). In the internet age, they also pop up regularly just for their general weirdness, including over at Boing Boing and Dangerous Minds.

Over 150 years later, Le Breton’s illustrations still come across as devilishly inventive. Check out more of these horrid creatures of sin below.

A demon from the <em>Dictionnaire Infernal</em>.A demon from the Dictionnaire Infernal. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain
Abigor, a war demon.Abigor, a war demon. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain
Ukobach, a minor oil demon.Ukobach, a minor oil demon. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain
The demon, Deumus.The demon, Deumus. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain
Just one of the dozens of demons from the <em>Dictionnaire Infernal</em>.Just one of the dozens of demons from the Dictionnaire Infernal. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain
The demon Ronwe.The demon Ronwe. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain
Candle-fingered demon, Yan-gant-y-tan.Candle-fingered demon, Yan-gant-y-tan. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain
Stolas, who is associated with astronomy and poisonous plants. Stolas, who is associated with astronomy and poisonous plants. Louis Le Breton/Public Domain

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

July 10, 2017 at 06:46PM

The Joy of Eavesdropping on Nell Dunn’s “Talking to Women”

The Joy of Eavesdropping on Nell Dunn’s “Talking to Women”

http://ift.tt/2sWZgTE

Joanna Biggs revisits “Talking to Women,” by Nell Dunn, which transcribes conversations the writer had with her women friends.

Travel

via Everything http://ift.tt/2toxdZ0

July 10, 2017 at 06:28PM

Emirates Is Laying Off Employees as Airline Seeks Efficiencies

Emirates Is Laying Off Employees as Airline Seeks Efficiencies

http://ift.tt/2sXu4Ul

Bloomberg

Emirates said it is still making critical hires but it is trimming employees in other roles. Bloomberg

Skift Take: Emirates, the largest long-haul airline on the planet, is trimming its workforce a tad in response to headwinds in its business.

— Dennis Schaal

Emirates is letting go of dozens of employees as the Persian Gulf carrier continues a push to streamline after years of rapid growth, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

The world’s biggest long-haul airline is scaling back senior cabin crew as well as the support department workforce including administration and IT, according to the people, who asked not to be identified as the information isn’t public. The cuts at Emirates, which froze hiring last summer and hasn’t taken on new crew in months, began in the last few weeks and affect middle and upper-level managers, they said.

Dubai-based Emirates said there is no company-wide program to reduce headcount and that “there is no change in staff turnover rates in the past weeks.”

The carrier continues to hire for “critical roles,” a spokeswoman said in an emailed response to questions, noting that “recruitment has slowed down as we streamline our operations, introduce new technologies, and find ways to better deploy existing resources internally.”

Emirates Group, which includes the airline and other travel and tourism entities, increased its workforce 11 percent in the fiscal year ended March 31 to more than 105,000 employees.

Industry Woes

Gulf airlines have had to adapt to tougher business conditions after years of expansion, with challenges ranging from the U.S. ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries to reduced spending power in the region due to low oil prices. Emirates, which last year posted its first annual profit drop since 2012, has streamlined operations, and the company has hired an outside consultant to assist in the review, one of the people said.

Abu-Dhabi based competitor Etihad Airways PJSC has also cut jobs amid an organizational restructuring, in an effort to reduce costs and improve productivity.

To lift revenue, Emirates has begun charging for seat selection, added fees for its airport lounges and may introduce premium-economy seats to boost sales amid waning growth in business class.

In a sign that measures taken so far have helped boost performance, Emirates President Tim Clark said in June that first-half earnings could be ahead of the year-ago period.

The airline is also considering combining with its low-cost sister FlyDubai, and examining the possibility of cooperating with discount long-haul carriers, whose rapid expansion in Asia and Europe poses a threat to its hub-based model.

 

©2017 Bloomberg L.P.

This article was written by Deena Kamel Yousef, Matthew Martin and Arif Sharif from Bloomberg and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Travel

via Skift https://skift.com

July 10, 2017 at 06:26PM

Blind Whino in Washington, D.C.

Blind Whino in Washington, D.C.

http://ift.tt/2tAasUU

Tucked away on a quiet inner city cul-de-sac, the Blind Whino building is an explosion of color amidst the bumpy asphalt and low-rise housing in Southwest Washington, D.C.

The building was home to the Friendship Baptist Congregation for almost a century and was a cornerstone of the neighborhood’s social fabric. Reimagined in recent years as an art space, it is now a treasured community hotspot once again.

The church was built in 1886 by former slaves and is one of the oldest extant buildings in Southwest. The fact that it has survived to the present day is something of a miracle. During the 1950s urban planners saw the neighborhood as as “blighted” and bulldozed nearly the entire thing to make way for freeways and public housing projects.

According to a 1960 Washington Post article, the District Redevelopment Land Agency bought up 98.5 percent of the area in the mid 1950s, evicted residents and tore down nearly everything, including more than 20 African-American churches. According to the Historic American Building Survey, Friendship Baptist was spared the wrecking ball because “the church’s pastor, Reverend Benjamin H. Whiting, argued that the church was a bedrock neighborhood institution,” and they had just completed an educational center addition.

Historic walls notwithstanding, the Friendship Baptist congregation ended up relocating to more spacious facilities nearby within a decade, and the aging religious house passed through a number of owners before finally closing in 2001. A real estate developer purchased the storied building with the intention of building condominiums and office space, but a 2004 Historic Preservation Board designation blocked the project.

Legally prevented from tearing down the century-old walls, the developer went back to the drawing board and commissioned Atlanta-based painter HENSE to enliven the facade with an artistic intervention. A colorful mural now wraps around the building like a Basquiat meets Jackson Pollock billboard. The psychedelic-looking graffiti continues throughout the interior and has transformed the former nave into a ravey performance space. Downstairs there is space for a gallery of rotating art exhibits, and a portion of the grounds are now used as a community garden. Going strong 130 years in, the newly renamed Blind Whino serves the neighborhood once again, though it now attracts a younger, more bohemian flock.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

July 10, 2017 at 06:04PM

Blind Whino in Washington, D.C.

Blind Whino in Washington, D.C.

http://ift.tt/2tAasUU

Tucked away on a quiet inner city cul-de-sac, the Blind Whino building is an explosion of color amidst the bumpy asphalt and low-rise housing in Southwest Washington, D.C.

The building was home to the Friendship Baptist Congregation for almost a century and was a cornerstone of the neighborhood’s social fabric. Reimagined in recent years as an art space, it is now a treasured community hotspot once again.

The church was built in 1886 by former slaves and is one of the oldest extant buildings in Southwest. The fact that it has survived to the present day is something of a miracle. During the 1950s urban planners saw the neighborhood as as “blighted” and bulldozed nearly the entire thing to make way for freeways and public housing projects.

According to a 1960 Washington Post article, the District Redevelopment Land Agency bought up 98.5 percent of the area in the mid 1950s, evicted residents and tore down nearly everything, including more than 20 African-American churches. According to the Historic American Building Survey, Friendship Baptist was spared the wrecking ball because “the church’s pastor, Reverend Benjamin H. Whiting, argued that the church was a bedrock neighborhood institution,” and they had just completed an educational center addition.

Historic walls notwithstanding, the Friendship Baptist congregation ended up relocating to more spacious facilities nearby within a decade, and the aging religious house passed through a number of owners before finally closing in 2001. A real estate developer purchased the storied building with the intention of building condominiums and office space, but a 2004 Historic Preservation Board designation blocked the project.

Legally prevented from tearing down the century-old walls, the developer went back to the drawing board and commissioned Atlanta-based painter HENSE to enliven the facade with an artistic intervention. A colorful mural now wraps around the building like a Basquiat meets Jackson Pollock billboard. The psychedelic-looking graffiti continues throughout the interior and has transformed the former nave into a ravey performance space. Downstairs there is space for a gallery of rotating art exhibits, and a portion of the grounds are now used as a community garden. Going strong 130 years in, the newly renamed Blind Whino serves the neighborhood once again, though it now attracts a younger, more bohemian flock.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura http://ift.tt/SEYBhH

July 10, 2017 at 06:02PM

These Endangered Pygmy Rabbits Survived a Wildfire by Heading Underground

These Endangered Pygmy Rabbits Survived a Wildfire by Heading Underground

http://ift.tt/2tGMVQG

article-image

In 2001, there were just 16 pygmy rabbits living in the wild in Washington state. Thanks to breeding programs at zoos and universities, and protection under the Endangered Species Act, North America’s smallest rabbit species started to make a comeback. So when the Sutherland Canyon wildfire swept through the sagebrush of eastern Washington at the end of June, biologists were worried that the it claimed the rabbits living at a special breeding site. They decided to stage a rescue as soon as the area was safe.

A team of biologists and firefighters found 32 rabbits—out of about 100—who survived the fire by retreating into their burrows. Rescuers found some still underground, while others had made their way to a tiny patch of surviving sagebrush. Sagebrush makes up nearly all of the rabbits’ diet, and provides them cover from predators. The destruction wrought by the fire means that the breeding site is now uninhabitable for rabbits—at least until the sagebrush grows back.

article-image

"The fire was a setback for our restoration program, but we can start making up for those losses next year," said Matt Monda, a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife regional wildlife manager, in a statement. "Wildfires are a fact of life here in sagebrush country, which is a major reason why we don’t keep all of the rabbits in one place." The survivors were taken to two nearby breeding sites, where they join about 70 others.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

July 10, 2017 at 05:43PM

Jardim do Nêgo (Nêgo’s Garden) in Campo do Coelho, Brazil

Jardim do Nêgo (Nêgo’s Garden) in Campo do Coelho, Brazil

http://ift.tt/2sXGX0N

Sculpture of a child in Jardim do Nêgo.

Gigantic clay sculptures covered in moss make Jardim do Nêgo in Campo do Coelho, a district of Nova Friburgo, a special place to visit. The unusual garden was created by artist Geraldo Simplício—a.k.a "Nêgo"—who lived as a hermit in the place for over 30 years.

Nêgo uses the landscape’s natural formations as the inspiration and foundation for his work. He covers the clay with moss, giving each sculpture an otherworldy yet earthy vibe.

The garden is a small, peaceful spot packed with larger-than-life works of art. There are currently 17 sculptures scattered throughout the place. Nêgo himself is typically present to greet visitors and chat about his work.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura – Latest Articles and Places http://ift.tt/UWqiBg

July 10, 2017 at 05:29PM

Jardim do Nêgo (Nêgo’s Garden) in Campo do Coelho, Brazil

Jardim do Nêgo (Nêgo’s Garden) in Campo do Coelho, Brazil

http://ift.tt/2sXGX0N

Sculpture of a child in Jardim do Nêgo.

Gigantic clay sculptures covered in moss make Jardim do Nêgo in Campo do Coelho, a district of Nova Friburgo, a special place to visit. The unusual garden was created by artist Geraldo Simplício—a.k.a "Nêgo"—who lived as a hermit in the place for over 30 years.

Nêgo uses the landscape’s natural formations as the inspiration and foundation for his work. He covers the clay with moss, giving each sculpture an otherworldy yet earthy vibe.

The garden is a small, peaceful spot packed with larger-than-life works of art. There are currently 17 sculptures scattered throughout the place. Nêgo himself is typically present to greet visitors and chat about his work.

Travel

via Atlas Obscura http://ift.tt/SEYBhH

July 10, 2017 at 05:27PM

Royal Jordanian Becomes the Latest Airline to Have U.S. Laptop Ban Lifted

Royal Jordanian Becomes the Latest Airline to Have U.S. Laptop Ban Lifted

http://ift.tt/2u0CI4l

John Taggart  / Flickr

Passengers aboard Royal Jordanian flights to the U.S. are no longer banned from carrying on laptops and other large electronic devices in the cabin. John Taggart / Flickr

Skift Take: Despite the fact that the U.S. laptop ban on Middle East carriers has been lifted, the return of U.S. restrictions on visas for citizens of six Muslim-majority countries may continue to hurt several airlines.

— Sean O’Neill

Jordan’s national airline has joined other Middle Eastern countries in lifting a ban on laptops in airplane cabins after complying with U.S. security guidelines.

Royal Jordanian said Sunday it has implemented “enhanced security measures” in line with U.S. Department of Homeland Security requirements. The airline did not describe the new measures.

The U.S. imposed the ban in March over concerns Islamic State fighters and other extremists could hide bombs inside of laptops.

The ban banned laptops from airplane cabins on direct, U.S.-bound flights from 10 cities in the Middle East and Turkey.

Royal Jordan operates 16 weekly non-stop flights to Chicago, New York and Detroit.

Several other airlines, including three based in the Gulf such as Kuwait Airways, have also lifted the ban in recent days.

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Travel

via Skift https://skift.com

July 10, 2017 at 05:16PM